1860-1882
Including a biographical directory of the faculty for the year 1882.
Submitted by Sheryl

CLASS OF 1860.

1. Sarah M. (Dunn) Strickler taught in the Peoria high school one year, in the Bloomington high school one year, and in a private school in Peoria two years. She married Mr. Strickler in August, 1862. They have two children. Their present residence is Philadelphia. Mrs. Strickler can always be reached by addressing her in care of Miss Hattie Dunn, Bloomington, Illinois.

2. Elizabeth J. (Mitchell) Christian taught in the Bloomington schools two years, and in the Decatur schools two years. She was married in 1865 to M. L. Christian. They have two children, a son and a daughter. Address is Bloomington, Illinois.

3. Frances A. (Peterson) Gastman was born in Sublette, Illinois, in 1839. She entered the formal School on the 5th day of October, 1857—the first day of the first term. She continued her studies until June, 1860, and graduated with the first class. Evincing unusual power as a teacher, she was retained as preceptress of the Institution, and remained in that position until June, 1862. On the 2_th of July succeeding, she was married to E. A. Gastman, who was teaching in Decatur, and removed to that city. With the beginning of the school year of 1862-3, she took a position in the high school which had just been organized. About the twenty-second of February following, she was taken sick in the school room, and after an illness of a little less than a week, she died.

4. Mary F. (Washburn) Hull was principal of the primary department of the model school in 1860-1. Her health, always delicate, became so poor that in 1862 she was obliged to resign. In April of the same year she was married to John Hull. They have two children. Her present address is Carbondale, Illinois.

5. Enoch A. Gastman, immediately after graduation, went to Decatur and commenced teaching in a primary school at forty-five dollars a month, six months in a year. In May, 1862, he was elected superintendent of city schools, and has held the position continuously since, nearly twenty years. He has been twice married—in 1862 to Miss Peterson, mentioned above, and in 1864 to Miss Caroline Sargent. They have four children. He is a member of the State Board of Education, treasurer of the State Teachers’ Association,—a position which he has held for several years,—president of the Normal Alumni Association, is especially interested in bee culture, and manages a farm near Hudson. He has been tendered positions in both of the State Normal Schools, but prefers to remain in Decatur. He was president of State Teachers’ Association in 1880.

6. Peter Harper taught a district school in Peoria County until the war. He then entered the army, and remained until the close of the war, finding himself much broken in health. He remained in Louisiana, was elected a member of the State Legislature, and in 1876 was elected Parish Judge. He was a candidate for the same position in 1878, but was defeated on the Louisiana plan. His health is not good. He is living on a farm purchased ten years ago. His address is St. Charles, Louisiana.

7. Silas Hays, Jr., after graduation, taught in the Wenona schools four months, in Elm Grove two years, and in El Paso one year. He traveled for Harper Brothers one year, and spent two years selling goods, he was principal of the Fairview schools one year, after which he bought a farm near Odell. Since 1869 he has taught seven winters, five of them in the same school, and two of them in “breaking-in” mutinous schools. His address is Odell, Illinois. He has taught seventy-four months since graduation. He is now farming at Rugby, Illinois.

8. Joseph Gideon Howell was born in Bethel, Bond County, Illinois, September 1, 1838, and died from the effects of a rifle ball through the head, on the bloody field of Donelson, February 15, 1862. He entered the Illinois Normal University, October 5, 1857, and graduated with his class, June 29, 1860, receiving the first diploma ever issued. During the fall and winter of 1860-1, he taught in the model school, but resigned his position to enlist as a private in the first company that left Bloomington, under the command of Captain Harvey. After the expiration of the ninety-days service, he was elected first lieutenant of Company K., Eighth Illinois Infantry. At the time of his death, he was serving as aid to Gen. R. J. Oglesby. He was a noble, Christian man in every sense of the word. He despised a mean, low act in anyone. His mind was singularly clear and decided. He reached a conclusion in a moment, and never hesitated to carry it out with his whole soul. Probably no one ever left the University with brighter prospects of usefulness than Joseph G. Howell. Had he lived, there can be no doubt that he would have stood in the front rank of teachers. He was a warm and devoted friend. Always happy and joyous, his very presence was an inspiration. The girls said that “he always laughed with his eyes.” He was brought to Bloomington and buried in the cemetery, although he had often expressed the wish that he might rest where he fell.

9. John Hull taught, 1860-1, at Salem, Illinois; 1861-2, in the model department of the State Normal School, and 1862-4 in Bloomington. During 1864-5 he was agent for Brewer & Tileston. The next four years he was in business in Bloomington. In 1869 he was elected superintendent of McLean County, and was re-elected in 1873. He resigned this position in 1875 to accept the chair of mathematics in the Southern Normal, which he still occupies. He was married in 1862 to Mary F. Washburne, mentioned above. Mr. Hull edited the Illinois Schoolmaster in 1868, was chairman of the executive committee of the State Teachers’ Association in 1873, president of the Association in 1874, chairman of the executive committee again in 1879, and is now the secretary of the Association. His address is Carbondale, Illinois.

10. Edwin Philbrook taught one year in Puna, was four years in the army, spent four years in various kinds of business at different points, teaching, meanwhile, one year at Heyworth. He was principal of the Maroa schools three years, of the Sabetha, Kansas, schools three years, of the Blue Rapids, Kansas, schools four years, and is at present principal of the third ward school in Decatur Mr. P. was married in 1871.


CLASS OF 1861.

11. Sophie J. (Grist) Gill was born in Perry County, Ohio, in 1840. She entered the Normal School in February, 1858, and graduated with the second class, in June, 1861. After graduation, she taught a year and a half in a female seminary in Greenfield, Illinois. In November, 1862, she was married to Gary Judson Gill. She accompanied her husband south, he being at that time in the army, and remained eight or nine months. She returned to Bloomington in July, 1863, suffering from disease contracted in the south. She died in November, 1863.

12. Amanda O. Noyes was born in Landhoff, New Hampshire, in 1830, and entered the Normal School in September, 1858, and graduated in 1861. Immediately after graduation she took a position in the schools of Jacksonville, and remained there for two years; but her health failed, and she was obliged to resign. She went to La Porte, Indiana, and resided with a brother there. After a painful illness of several months, she died on February 7, 1864.

13. J. H. Burnham, immediately after graduation, entered the army as lieutenant of the Normal company of the Thirty-Third Regiment. He subsequently became captain of the same company. In April, 1863, he resigned on account of ill-health, and returned to Bloomington. He was superintendent of the Bloomington schools one year, was editor of the Pantagraph two years, and since 1867 has been agent of the King Iron Bridge Company. In 1866 he was married to Almira S. Ives. His address is Bloomington.

14:. Aaron Grove entered the Thirty-Third Regiment immediately after graduation, and soon became adjutant of the regiment. He remained in the army two years, was in business two years, was principal of the Rutland schools two years, and principal of the Normal public schools for five years. In August, 1874, he was elected city superintendent of the Denver, Colorado, schools, which position he still occupies. He purchased the Schoolmaster of Mr. Hull, and the Illinois Teacher of Mr. Nason, and consolidated the two journals. Mr. Grove was married to Cora Spafford, of Massachusetts, in 1865. They have four children—two boys and two girls.

15. Moses Morgan, immediately after the battle of Bull Run, entered the army and remained a year and a half, when he resigned with prostrated health. In 1863-4 he was principal of the third ward school in Peoria. In 1864 he again entered the army, in a civil capacity, and served until June, 1866. He removed to Brecksville, Ohio, and commenced farming, and in two years recovered his health. In 1865 he was married to Miss Laura Green. They have buried one child, and have two living. His address is Brecksville, Ohio.

16. Henry B. Norton taught one term in the model school, in 1861. In 1862-3 he taught at Warsaw. The year 1864 he was editor of the Bloomington Pantagraph. In 1864-5 he was county superintendent of Ogle County. In 1865 he resigned, and accepted a position in the Kansas State Normal School, at Emporia. He remained there five years. The years 1870-73 were spent in newspaper work and traveling. In 1873 he returned to the Emporia Normal School, where he remained two years, resigning to accept a position in the San Jose, California, Normal School, where he has since remained. He was married in 1864. They have three children. Address is San Jose, California.

17. Peleg E. Walker taught in Dement, 1861-2. He enlisted as private in Company K, Ninety-Second Illinois, in 1862, and was made lieutenant in April, 1863. He commanded the company in nearly every battle in which they were engaged, “Marched from Atlanta to the Sea,” and thence by way of Carolina to Virginia, and was on an advanced post when Johnston surrendered. On his return, he was elected principal of the Creston schools, where he remained for seven years. In 1872 he resigned, to accept the principalship of the Rochelle schools, which he has held continuously since. He was married in August, 1865. They have one girl, born in 1871.

18. Harvey J. Dutton entered the Thirty-Third Regiment immediately after graduation, and remained four years, becoming captain before the close of the war. On his return to Illinois he commenced farming, and removed to Missouri in 1860, where he had purchased a farm. He has taught from four to six mouths each winter for nine successive winters. In August, 1866, he was married to Louise V. Brinsden. They have four children—three girls and one boy. His address is Virgil City, Missouri.


CLASS OF 1862.

19. Sarah E. Beers taught four years at Normal Center, and part of 1866 in the Canton high school. In 1868, she opened a private school in Canton, and has conducted it continuously since, excepting the year 1878-9. She owns a neat little school house of her own. She is librarian of a circulating library and teaches some. She writes, February, 1882, “I do not propose to teach at all, on the account of deafness, but the people insist upon keeping me in the harness. I love the work, and would gladly spend the remainder of my life in it.”

20. Elizabeth Carleton for four years following her graduation, was first assistant in the Griggsville high school. During the next four years she was principal of the grammar school in the same town. For ten years she was employed in the Hannibal, Missouri, schools. From September, 1881, to April, 1882, she was traveling. She then resumed work in Hannibal.

21. Helen (Grennell) Guild, immediately after graduation accepted the position of first assistant in the Peoria high school, where she remained for the succeeding ten years. In 1872 she resigned to take a similar position in the St. Louis high school. In 1874, she was married to Albert D. Guild, Chicago. Her present address is Lakeside, Michigan.

22. Esther M. Sprague, for four years after graduation, was principal of the intermediate department of the fourth ward school in Peoria. During the year 1806-7 she was principal of the model school in Platteville, Wisconsin, formal School. The six years succeeding she was head assistant in the Kinzie school, Chicago. She was for seven years principal of Lincoln street school. From September, 1880, to March 1881, she did not teach. Since then she has been in the Foster school.

23. Emma (Trimble) Bangs in 1862-3 taught in York, Kendall County; in 1863— in Washington. Illinois; in 1861-5 in Lacon: in 1865-6 in Sparland; in 1866-7 in Lacon. She then learned the printer’s trade from the “devil” to the editor’s chair. She was postmistress of Hillsboro for eight years. She is now local editress of Montgomery County News.

24. Lorenzo D. Bovee entered the army in 1862, and served one year in the One Hundredth Illinois Volunteers. In 1863 he was discharged on account of ill health. He taught only one year, his health having been impaired by service in the army. He is now engaged in farming near Chetopa, Kansas.

25. James F. Ridlon taught at Abingdon in 1862-3 and at Henderson during the winter of 1863-4. He entered the army in 1864, and at the close of the war taught in Monmouth during the winter of 1865-6. In 1866 he went to Kansas, and taught in Lawrence the winter term of 1866-7, and at Lanesville during the winter of 1868-9. In 1869-70 he was a member of the Kansas Legislature, and took an active part in all legislation affecting educational matters. He was married in 1870, and had charge of the DeSoto schools during the succeeding year. He then went on his farm, surveyed one year, and taught every winter until June, 1878. He is now farming during the summer, and acting as Grange lecturer in winter.

26. Logan Holt Roots was principal of DuQuoin schools before receiving a diploma. In the summer of 1862 he entered the army and served till the close of the war; “Marched to the Sea;” was in “grand reunion” at Washington; went south with Sherman, and remained in the army a while after the close of the war. He resigned, bought a plantation, raised cotton, and was successful. He was a member of the Fortieth and Forty-first Congress, and was afterward U. S. marshal in Arkansas. Since 1872 he has been president of the Merchant’s National Bank at Little Rock.


CLASS OF 1863.

27. Mary A. Fuller was born in Tazewell County, Illinois, in 1841. She entered the formal School, April 13, 1860, before the occupancy of the new building. She remained until her graduation, in 1863. Immediately after graduation, she commenced work in Decatur, as assistant in one of the grammar schools, and remained there for seven years. Resigning, she accepted the principalship of the Magnolia schools, which she retained three years. This proved to be the last of her work as a teacher. Her family had moved to Normal, and there Miss Fuller joined them to enjoy the quiet of her pleasant home and to devote herself to the further development of her cultured mind. After a visit to England and the Continent, and a rest of three or four years, she spent a year in the Boston School of Oratory, and was seriously thinking of resuming her teaching work, of which she was ardently fond, when she was suddenly attacked with a fatal illness, and in a few hours she had entered into a new life. She was a woman of rare poise of character. Her habits were those of the scholar. She loved the seclusion of home and the companionship of books; but she was no recluse. She felt the currents of our busy modern life, and shrank from no duty that came to her door. The thoughtful, earnest, sincere, clear-faced little woman, impressed herself with singular force upon her associates, for she always brought with her suggestions of higher living and purer atmospheres of thought. To scores of young lives she gave such trend and inspiration that she still lives in many a home to enrich and bless it by the potency of her character. She was buried at her old home in Tazewell County.

28. Sarah F. (Gove) Baldwin taught one year in Granville, and two years in Peoria. In April, 1866, she was married to Eugene F. Baldwin. They have three children. Her address is Peoria, care of Journal.

29. Abbie K. (Reynolds) Wilcox taught one term in Bloomington. In June, 1864, she was married to Mr. Wilcox. They have three children living, and have lost two. She has since studied Kindergarten work, and is now a Kindergarten teacher in St. Louis.

30. Sarah Hackett Stevenson taught in Bloomington, Mt. Morris, and Sterling, aggregating four years in these places. She studied medicine in Chicago, and subsequently went to England, where she continued her studies with Prof. Huxley. In 1875 she was elected to the chair of Physiology in the Woman’s College, in Chicago, which position she still retains. She is quite widely known as a lecturer and writer, and also as the author of a charming book, “Boys and Girls in Biology,” published by D. Appleton & Co. Her address is Woman’s College, Chicago.

31. W. Dennis Hall began teaching at Granville, Illinois, in September, 1863. He remained there during the year 1863-4, excepting the last two months, spent in the army. He left the army about the first of November, 1864, and began teaching in Brimfield, Illinois. He remained there three months. During the spring term of 1864-5. he had charge of the second ward school, in Peoria. During the year 1865-6 he had charge of the Elmwood schools. In September, 1866, he took charge of the Clinton schools, and remained there nearly five years. From 1869 to 1872 he was superintendent of LaSalle schools. During the years 1872-3, and 1873-4, he held a similar position in Centralia. In 1871, and a part of 1875, he did not teach. The last five months of 1875-6 he had charge of the Farmer City schools. Since June, 1876, he has been in the employ of D. Appleton & Co. He was married about 1868, and has one daughter. His address is 310 State Street, Chicago.

32. Ebenezer D. Harris, the three years succeeding his graduation, had charge of one, of the ward schools of Peoria. He then engaged in market-gardening on a somewhat large scale, near Lincoln, Nebraska. Since February, 1880, he has taught two terms in Lancaster County, Nebraska. He is now teaching.

33. John B. Thompson was born in McLean County, Illinois, in 1842, and entered school in 1860. He graduated with the fourth class, in 1863. Desiring to fit himself more fully for teaching, he remained the succeeding year, continuing his studies, in the high school, and acting also as assistant in the same department. In 1864-5 he taught in El Paso, and in 1865-6 in Charleston. In the fall of 1866 he went to Kansas and taught there in 1866-7, returning to Illinois in the summer of 1867, with his health much impaired. He gradually declined, and in January, 1869, died at his home near Bloomington. He was an intense worker, and carried into his chosen profession a high degree of enthusiasm and earnestness.


CLASS OF 1864.

34. Hattie E. Dunn has taught constantly since graduation, as follows: 1864-5 in Springfield; 1865-71 in Bloomington ward schools; 1871-2 in Carbondale; 1872-3 in Carrollton; 1873-5 in Bloomington high school, as assistant, and since November, 1875, she has been principal of the same school. Her address is Bloomington.

35. Anna (Gunnell) Hatfield taught one year in Bloomington, and two in Peoria. Her address is Mrs. William Hatfield, care of Merchants’ National Bank, Chicago.

36. Edith (Johnson) Morley taught one year in Aurora, three years in the model school, Normal, and two years in Bonhams Female Seminary, St. Louis. In. 1871 she was married to Rev. John H. Morley. She writes in January, 1882, “Taking care of a good husband, two sons and a daughter.” Her address is Winona, Minn.

37. Isabella More taught four years in Conovers Seminary, Bloomington; one year in Cairo, one year in Perry, and about three years in ungraded schools. On account of ill health, she did not teach for a few years. She resumed work in June, 1876. In 1877 was a candidate for county superintendent of Pike County; opposite party had a majority of 1,000; she was defeated by a little over 100. Since June, 1879, she has taught as follows: Six months in Perry, and four months in Independence, Perry township, where she is now teaching.

38. Harriet E. Stewart. No report has been received from this lady.

39. George Colvin was principal of Atlanta, Illinois, schools two years, of the Pontiac schools two years, and has had charge of the Pekin schools since September, 1871. In May, 1865, he was married to Miss Sallie Bergen. They have two children. His address is Pekin.

40. Lyman B. Kellogg continued his studies at Normal for a time after graduation, teaching meanwhile. In 1865 he was elected principal of the Kansas State Normal School in Emporia. He organized the school and remained at its head for seven years. Since 1872 he has been engaged in business, and the practice of law. He was married in 1866. His wife died in 1873, leaving two boys. His address is Emporia.

41. Philo A. Marsh has taught but one year since graduation, and that was at Magnolia in 1864-5. Since then he has been engaged in railroading and milling. He was for a time passenger conductor on the P., D. & E. E. E. He is now agent for the L, B. & W. E. E. at Urbana, and is interested in a flouring mill near Atlanta. His address is Urbana.


CLASS OF 1865.

42. Olinda (Johnson) Nichols taught nearly all the time until her marriage in 1869. Her address is Mrs. N. F. Nichols, Aurora, Illinois.

43. Almenia C. Jones has taught every school month since graduation. She taught two years in Pekin, two in Lewistown, and the remaining time in Canton, where she resides.

44. Lucinda (Standard) Johnson taught in 1865-6 in Centralia; the succeeding three years she taught in Charleston; in 1869-70 she taught in St. Cloud, Minnesota, Normal School. After this she taught one year in Ft. Smith, Arkansas, six months in Little Rock, and two and a half years in the Arkansas State University, at Fayetteville. The summer of 1874 she spent in Europe. On her return she was married to A. O. Johnson, Esq., a lawyer of Drake’s Creek, Arkansas.

45. Bandusia Wakefield has taught as follows: Four terms in the model school; one term in Farmer City, Illinois; one term in Atlanta, Illinois; two years in Winterset, Iowa; one year in Emporia, Kansas; one term in Farmington, Illinois; two terms in Bloornington, Illinois; six and a half years in the Illinois Normal University. She resigned at the close of winter term, 1880-1, to take charge of her brother’s children. Her address is Sioux City, Iowa.

46. Thomas J. Burrill had charge of the Varna schools three years. Since September, 1868, he has occupied a chair in the Industrial University at Champaign. For the last few years he has been professor of Botany and Horticulture. He is widely known among the leading agriculturists and horticulturists of the State, as he spends considerable time in lecturing upon topics of great economic interest to that part of our population. He was married in 1868.

47. John W. Cook was born in New York, April 20, 1844, and is the son of Col. H. D. Cook. In 1851 Mr. Cook came west with his parents, and settled in McLean County, Illinois. He entered the State Normal University in 1862, and graduated in 1865. He then began teaching school at Brimfield, Peoria County, Illinois. Here he remained but one year, and returned to Normal, and became principal in the model school department. In 1867 he was married to Lydia Spafford, sister of Mrs. Gen. Hovey. In 1868 he became a member of the Normal Faculty, and taught history and geography. In 1869 he changed to reading and elocution. In 1876 he was appointed professor of mathematics.

48. William Florin, 1865-6, was principal of the grammar department of the Lebanon schools; 1866-7 he was principal of the Highland schools; 1867-70 was principal of Lebanon, and 1870-2 of the Highland schools; 1872-3 he had charge of a grammar school in Belleville; 1875-6 he was assistant in the high school at the same place; 1876-7 he had charge of the Edwardsville schools, and in 1877-9 he held a similar position in St. Jacob. In the summer of 1879, after teaching steadily for fourteen years, he concluded to go into business. He is now selling drugs at Altamont.

49. David M. Fulwiler, 1865-6 was principal of the Lexington schools; 1866-9 he held the same position in Hillsboro. In 1869 he left teaching and went into business. In 1876 he became a short-hand reporter. He has taught one year since. His address is Lexington.

50. Oscar F. McKim taught one year in the model school, and for three years was principal of the second ward school in Decatur. He served four years as county superintendent of Macon county, and was associate principal of Decatur high school one year. In 1874 he commenced practicing law. He removed to Kansas in 1875, and taught in Oxford in 1875-6. He was principal of the Wichita schools 1876-8, and of the Wellington schools 1878-9. The next year he was an attorney-at-law agent. He is now teaching at Dallas City. Mr. McKim was married in 1866.

51. Adolph A. Suppiger, in 1865-7, was principal of the Maine schools, and 1867-73 of the Highland schools. He served four years as county superintendent of Madison County. After his term expired he taught six months in Venice, and one year in North Alton. He is now in business in Pierson. He was married in 1870, and has three children.

52. Melancthon Wakefield taught two terms in the model school after graduation. In 1866-7 he had charge of the Buda schools; 1867-8 of the Carrollton schools, and 1868-9 of the Cherokee, Iowa, schools. He has not taught since June, 1869, but has been practicing law in Cherokee. He has served three terms as mayor.

53. William McCambridge (H. S.) was station agent at Normal until 1871. He has been engaged in newspaper work since, and is now editor of the Pantagraph, Bloomington, Illinois.

54. Gertrude K. Case (H. S.) taught six years in Bloomington, and was three years principal of the primary department of the model school. She was married in 1875. Her address is Mrs. Wesley Young, Dayton, Ohio.

55. Howard C. Crist (H. S.) studied medicine, and, with the exception of one year spent in Arizona as United States Mission Surgeon, has been practicing in Bloomington.

56. Charles L. Capen (H. S.) entered Harvard University in 1865, and graduated in 1869. He then studied law in Bloomington, and is now a member of the law firm of Williams, Burr & Capen. He married Miss Nellie Briggs, in October, 1875.

57. Robert McCart (H, S.) graduated at the Ann Arbor law school, in 1867. He practiced in Bloomington until 1877, and then settled in Fort Worth, Texas.

58. Clara V. (Fell) Fyffe (H. S.) married James Fyffe, now deceased. Her address is Normal.

59. Hosea Howard (H. S.) is in the office of the Wabash, St. Louis and Pacific Railroad, St. Louis.


CLASS OF 1866.

60. Harriet (Case) Morrow was principal of the high school department of Hartley’s Normal Academy, in Richmond, Indiana, in 1866-7. For four years, 1867 to 1871, she was principal of a grammar school in Ottawa, Illinois, except part of one year when she was assistant in the high school. For two years, 1871-3, she was teacher of mathematics in the Leavenworth, Kansas, high school. From September, 1873, to January 1878, she was preceptress in the Illinois State Normal School. In January, 1878, she was married to Mr. Morrow, of the lake survey. They have one son. Their home is Tonganoxie, Kansas.

61. Martha Foster taught two years in the intermediate department of the Yates City schools, one year in the intermediate department of the model school at Normal, two terms in country schools near Yates City, one year in Boone, Iowa, one year in Lindsay, Kansas, five years in Dexter, Iowa, and one year in Ottawa, Kansas. She also taught in six Normal Institutes, one month each, and three months in Junction City, Kansas. Her health having been somewhat impaired, she was obliged to give up teaching for a time. Since June, 1880, she taught seven months at her home in Maquon, Illinois.

62. Harriet A. Fyffe taught two years in Menard County, two years in the public schools of Normal, and for three years was principal of the Magnolia schools. She is now engaged in the drug business in Magnolia, Illinois.

63. Margaret (McCambridge) Hurd taught in the Cairo schools in 1866-7. In 1867 she was married to Charles R. Hurd. They have three daughters. Their residence is in Denver, Colorado.

64. Mary E. Pearce taught one year in Carrollton, one in Shelby County, one in Farmington, six in Lexington, and two in the public schools of Normal. The year 1877-8 was spent in California, and in 1878-9 she did not teach. In 1879-80 she was principal of the West Side school in El Paso. In 1880-1 she taught six months near Hudson. Since September she has been teaching in Lexington. Her address is Normal, Illinois.

65. Alice (Piper) Blackburn taught six years in the public schools of Macomb—two years in the grammar school and four in the high school. In 1872 she was married, and removed to California. They have one daughter, six years old. Her home is in San Buena Ventura, California.

66. Helen (Plato) Wilbur, from October, 1866, to March, 1867, taught in Kaneville; from September, 1867, to February, 1868, in Elgin; from February, 1868, to March, 1871, in Chicago. In 1871, she was married. Mr. Wilbur died a few months after their marriage. In December, 1874, she resumed teaching in Chicago, and has been so employed constantly since. Her address is 256 Ontario Street.

67. Sarah E. Raymond, in 1866-8, taught in Fowler Institute, Newark, Illinois, as assistant in the English department. 1868-9, she was assistant in a ward school in Bloomington. From September, 1869, to March, 1873, she was principal of the same school. The spring term of 1873, she was assistant in the high school. 1873-4, she was principal of the high school, and since September, 1874, she has been city superintendent of the Bloomington schools.

68. Olive (Rider) Cotton, 1866-7, was principal of the intermediate department of the model school at Normal. The six years succeeding, she taught in the schools of Griggsville. In 1873, on account of poor health, she gave up teaching. The succeeding three years were spent in California, New York, and Massachusetts. In January, 1878, she took a position in the Normal public schools, and remained there until June. In 1879, she was married to Alfred C. Cotton, of the class of 1869. Since then, she has spent two years in California, and one year in New York. They reside in Turner Junction, Illinois.

69. Julia (Stanard) Frost taught one year in Charleston, Illinois, one in Whitehall, one in Jersey County, one in Ottawa, two in Atlanta, and five months in Bureau County. After resting three years, she began teaching in Atlantic, Iowa. She taught one year in the primary department, two in the grammar, and since 1879 has been assistant in the high school. She was married in 1867 to R. H. Frost. They have one child.

70. Nelson Case was principal of the Tolono schools in 1866-7. He has not taught since. He studied law at Ann Arbor, and since his admission has been practicing in Oswego, Kansas. He was married in 1872. He is now judge of the probate court.

71. Philo A. Clark was principal of the Chillicothe schools one year, of the Neponset schools one year, one year near Davenport, and one year in county schools in Kendall County. For two years he was agent for school apparatus and furniture. He was a wholesale merchant and resided in Peoria; was then in the school furniture business. He left Peoria in October, 1878, to travel for a spice and tea house of Omaha. In 1879 he removed to Madison, where he has inherited considerable property.

72. John Ellis jr., for three years, 1866-9, was principal of the Naples schools. The next three years, 1869-72, he was principal of the West Side schools in El Paso. In 1872 he went to Beatrice, Neb., and engaged in real estate and loan business. In 1878 he was elected county treasurer. He was married in 1872, and has two children.

73. Joseph Hunter was born in New York in 1843. He entered the Normal School in September, 1863. In 1866-7 he was principal of the Pontiac schools. The next year he took a position in Washington University, St. Louis. Here he commenced the study of law. In 1869 he was admitted, and located at Rockford, but soon changed his residence to Mendota, where he remained until 1875, gaining, meanwhile, a lucrative practice. In 1873 he was married to the only child of J. O. Crocker, Esq., of Mendota. Thinking that a change of climate would improve his enfeebled health, in 1875 he removed to Lincoln, Nebraska, and formed a partnership with a leading attorney of that place. In the year 1880 his old friends at Normal were shocked to learn of his sudden death, which occurred on the 17th of April. He leaves a wife and four children. Mr. Hunter was an unusually modest, quiet man, gentle and tender as a woman, and generous to a fault. The rich treasures of his deep, true nature were hidden from the many to be revealed to the few. During his school days he was often called “Lincoln,” from his resemblance to the martyred president in personal appearance, and in the general cast of his intellectual and social nature. Once known he could not be forgotten. His individuality was strongly marked. He was universally esteemed, and his untimely death brings the keenest sorrow to hundreds of his early mates, as well as to the friends of his maturer years.

74. Richard Porter taught one year in Perry, one in Rantoul, one in Monticello, and three years in country schools. In 1877 he removed to Kansas, and is now farming near Bavaria. He is married and has two children.


CLASS OF 1867.

75. Emily (Chandler) Hodgin, immediately after graduation, was married to her classmate, Cyrus W. Hodgin. She has taught only one term. They reside in Terre Haute, Indiana.

76. Emily (Cotton) Collins taught in Griggsville, Collinsville, Cairo, and Decater—nine years in all. In September, 1876, she was married to Wm. H. Collins, of Quincy. They have one daughter.

77. Nellie Forman, immediately after graduation, began teaching in West Bridgewater, Massachusetts. She remained there a year and a half, when her health became so poor that she was obliged to resign. She spent two years in the study of music, and three years as a teacher in Lynn, Massachusetts. For seven years she held a position in the Mercantile Savings Bank, Boston. Since October. 1881, she has been teaching at Hampton Institute, Virginia.

78. Mary W. French, in 1867-9, taught in the Cairo schools. Since 1869, she has been an assistant in the Decatur high school.

79. Eurania (Gorton) Hanna, from September, 1867, to June, 1869, taught in the Rock Island high school; from 1869 to June, 1871, in the Peru high school; from 1871 to June, 1872, she was principal of the Aurora preparatory, and from September, 1872, to May, 1874, was assistant in the Aurora high school. In May, 1874, she was married to John R. Hanna, of Aurora. They have one daughter.

80. Mary R. Gorton was born in Rock Island, Illinois, in 1844, and entered the Normal School in December, 1862. Having had superior advantages, she at once took high rank in her classes. She remained in school until June, 1865, when she interrupted her studies and taught a year in Rock Island. Returning in the fall of 1866, she completed her course, graduating in the class of 1867. After graduation, she returned to Rock Island and taught one year in the high school. Her career as a student and teacher had been so eminently successful that in 1868 she was called to a position in the Cook County Normal School, where she remained until April, 1871. She then accepted a call to the Normal Department of the Arkansas State University. In June, 1876, she was appointed principal of this department. In June, 1877, she tendered her resignation, and accepted an assistant’s place in the Peabody branch high school, St. Louis. Here she remained until her death, November 15, 1878. Her appearance was unusually prepossessing; richly endowed in person and intellect, with a rare dignity of manner, quick sympathies, thorough scholarship, a genius for governing, and a noble ambition to excel. She produced a profound impression upon all who came within the circle of her influence. Dr. Harris, in a recent letter, paid a glowing tribute to her rare qualities of mind and heart. In the full maturity of a noble womanhood, she went out of this life into the infinite possibilities of the unseen.

81. Mary (Pennell) Barber taught in the model school the spring term of 1868, and again from January, 1869 to June, 1870. She spent the year 1870-1 at Vassar College; 1871-2 she taught in the Peoria County Normal school; from January to June, 1874, in the Polo high school; in 1874-5 in the Normal public school, and the fall of 1875 in the Tuscola high school. In December, 1875, she was married to A. H. Barber. They reside at No. 9 Langley Avenue, Chicago.

82. Onias C. Barber taught one year in Illinois, and two years in Mississippi. He has been on a farm most of the time since graduation. His health, feeble from childhood, has prevented severe labor. Since 1876 he has been clerking in Tamaroa, selling books and stationery.

83. John R. Edwards was born in Ohio, in 1839, and became a student in the Normal School in September, 1865, taking an advanced standing. He completed the course in two years, graduating with the eighth class in June, 1867. He was at once appointed to the principalship of the Hyde Park schools, and remained there one year. In the fall of 1868 he was called to the principalship of the Evanston schools; but in the spring of 1869 his failing health obliged him to resign. In August he was married to Miss Annie E. Downs, of Hyde Park, and was elected principal of the third ward school in Peoria. An injury received during the war had seriously broken his health, and again his failing strength obliged him to give up his position, which he did in March, 1870. He removed to Hyde Park, where, after a lingering illness of more than a year, he died, in April, 1871. He was of the thousands who escaped death upon the field of battle to die a victim of the great war in the early years that succeeded it.

84. George E. Hinman has taught five years since graduation. He has spent three years in Colorado, and four in Ohio. He was married in 1871, but lost his wife in 1876. He is now living on a farm near Granville.

85. Cyrus W. Hodgin was married to Emily Chandler in 1867. They have one child. For two years he was principal of the Richmond, Indiana, high school, and for three years was principal of the Henry County independent high school. From September, 1872, to June, 1881, he was a professor in the State Normal School in Terre Haute. He then resigned this position, and is now resting and doing institute work.

86. Fred J. Seybold has not taught since graduation. He acted as book agent for Sherwood & Co., for a time, and subsequently was admitted to the bar. His address is not known.

87. James S. Stevenson was married in 1861; 1867-9 he was principal of the Sparta schools; 1869-70 he had charge of the fourth academic department, Washington University; 1870-2 he was principal of the Collinsville schools, and since September, 1872, he has been principal of the Bates school, St. Louis. His address is 1115 N. Park Place.


CLASS OF 1868.

88. Ruthie E. (Baker) Scarrat was principal of Normal public high school three years, and assistant in Alton high school one and one-half years. In April, 1873, she was married to Isaac Scarrat, who died not long after. She subsequently married his brother. She taught one year in the Chicago schools, after the death of her husband, before her second marriage. Her address is Mrs. Nathan Scarrat, Kansas City, Missouri.

89. Ann Eliza Bullock taught, 1868-9, near Tonica. Subsequently she taught four terms in Bloomington, and five in Tonica. She is not teaching now.

90. Jemima S. Burson taught four years in Richmond, Indiana, and one and one-fourth years in Spiceland, Indiana, but is not teaching now, on account of ill health. Her address is Richmond.

91. Lydia A. Burson taught four years in Richmond, one-third of a year at Carthage, and one year at Spiceland, Indiana. Her health will not permit her to teach. Her address is Richmond.

92. Etta L. Dunbar, 1868-70, was principal of the Blackburn schools; 1870-74, of DeKalb schools. She was then obliged to give up teaching on account of ill health. Three years were spent in taking care of an invalid mother. She is now painting. Her address is Longmont, Colorado.

93. Anna C. Gates taught one year at Tolono, and since September, 1869, has been principal of the Gravvis school, St. Louis.

94. S. Grace (Harwood) Whitney has taught one year at Council Hill, two years as first assistant of Alton high school, and three years and a half at Clear Creek, Illinois. In April she was married to Ezra Whitney, of Livingston County, New York. She then conducted an educational department in the Henry Republican, and afterward devoted her attention to primary work. In 1879-81 she taught in Magnolia, and is now teaching in the Soldiers’ Orphans’ Home.

95. Lucia (Kingsley) Manning was, for three years, principal of the primary department of model school, and for four years was assistant in the Peru, Indiana, high school. She was married August, 1870, to G. G. Manning, of Peru.

96. Eliza A. (Pratt) Kean for four years was a teacher in the Bloomington high school. Her address is 99 Washington Street, Chicago.

97. Emma T. (Robinson) Kleckner has taught two years and two months. She was married in July, 1870. Her address is Freeport, Illinois.

98. Mary J. (Smith) Bogardus taught one year at Marengo, and two terms in Springfield. Her address is Mrs. S. Bogardus, Springfield, Illinois.

99. Cornelia Valentine was born in Indiana, in 1846. She entered the Normal School in September, 1865, and remained until her graduation, June, 1868. The year of 1868-9 she taught in Earlham College, Richmond, Indiana. The succeeding year, and until April, 1871, she was assistant in the Rushville (Illinois) high school, leaving this position on account of the sickness and death of her sister. The succeeding year she was an assistant in the Rock Island high school, and the year following (1872-3) she held a similar position in Aurora. She remained in Aurora only five months, ill health compelling her to resign. After several weeks of rest, she accepted the chair of mathematics in the Methodist College in Jacksonville, Illinois. Here she remained until the summer of 1874. In September, 1874, she returned to Rock Island, first as assistant, but soon after as principal of the high school. She remained until April, 1877, when a sudden attack of typhoid malarial fever obliged her to resign. She returned to her home in Richmond, followed by the anxious solicitude of loving friends. She endured her terrible suffering without a murmur, and on the twentieth of June, 1877, “entered into rest.”

100. Clara E. Watts was one year matron of temporary Soldiers’ Orphans’ Home, for two years was teacher in Soldiers’ Orphans’ Home at Normal, and one year was principal of the intermediate department of the Normal public schools. She is now residing in Normal.

101. Stephen Bogardus, in August, 1868, married Miss Mary J. Smith. For two years he was principal of the Marengo schools. Since September, 1870, he has been proprietor of the Springfield Business College.

102. William A. McBane taught two years at Cairo and Metropolis, published a weekly paper three years, purchased a ferry franchise at Metropolis, and ran a steam ferry three years. He then went into the real estate business, and has taught but one year (1880-1 in Metropolis) since. His address is Metropolis, Illinois.

103. Henry McCormick was born in 1837, in Mayo County, Ireland. In 1853 he came to America, spent two years in Ohio, one in West Virginia, and then went to Wisconsin, working on a farm in summer and going to school in winter, until the winter of 1859-60, when he taught his first school in a log school house for $16 a month, “boarding around.” The school house being on the line between Illinois and Wisconsin, he had to undergo examination in both States. The next year he was promoted to a stone school house and $23 a month. This school he had four months of every year until the spring of 1865, when he came here as a student. In 1809, one year after graduation, he was appointed professor of geography. In the intervening year he was principal of the formal public school. Now he is professor of history and geography at the University. Last year, 1882, he received the decree of Ph. D. from the Wesleyan University.

104. Jacob Rightsell was one year principal of a ward school, and for three years superintendent of city schools, at Little Rock. He was married in August, 1871. For two years he had charge of the H. R. library, Washington, D. C. He then was county superintendent of Pulaski County, Arkansas, one year. He is now principal of the largest graded school in Arkansas,—Peabody school—in Little Rock.

105. William Russell was married in August, 1868. 1868-9 he taught in Newport, Indiana; 1869-73 at Marion, Indiana; one year in Normal School at Terre Haute, and 1874-7 at Salem, Indiana. Since 1877 he has been teaching in Marion. He has charge of a township school six to seven months a year, and is employed in a Normal School about twenty weeks a year.

106. Elnia Valentine was born in Indiana in 1849. She entered school in 1865 and graduated in 1868. Immediately after graduation she became a teacher in the Friends’ Academy in Richmond, Indiana. She remained there until the latter part of February, 1871, when failing health obliged her to resign. Her position was very agreeable, and was not the occasion of her illness. In spite of medical assistance and the tender care of loving friends, she gradually sank away, until the fourteenth of April, when she passed from earth.

107. Annie M. (Edwards) Dougherty (H. S.) was married in December, 1871, to N. C. Dougherty. She taught six months in a seminary in St. Louis, and one year in the Princeton high school. Her address is Peoria.

108. R. Arthur Edwards (H. S.) graduated from the Normal Department with class of 1870. 1870-1 he was principal of Paxton schools; 1871-2 of Monticello schools; 1872-3 at Dartmouth College; 1873-4 teacher of Latin and Greek in Rock River Seminary, Mt. Morris; 1874-76 was junior and senior in Princeton College, New Jersey, graduating in 1876; 1878-80 was acting professor of English literature and rhetoric in Knox College. He was married in December, 1879, to Miss Alice M. Shirk, of Peru, Indiana. He is now in a bank in Peru.


CLASS OF 1869.

109. Lizzie L. Alden, 1869-70, was principal of schools in Caledonia, Illinois; 1870-1 was assistant in Lena high school; 1871-4 she taught a country school near Brimfield; 1874-5 traveled in the east; 1875-7 taught in the Burton, Kansas, schools. She is now teaching in Sedgwick.

110. Melissa (Benton) Overman taught in Geneseo from 1869 to 1871. In the spring term of 1872 she taught in the Dixon high school, and in 1872-3 in the Freeport high school. In 1873 she was married to A. H. Overman. Address Mrs. A. H. Overman, care of Jansen, McClurg & Co., Chicago.

111. Ella K. Briggs taught one year at her home in Logan County, two years at Lincoln, one year at Delavan, one year at Jerseyville, and was two years principal of Cream Ridge, Logan County, schools. After resting one year she taught at Freeport two years. Her health failed, and she went to Minnesota, where she suffered a long and painful illness. Since June, 1879, she has taught two years in Freeport, Illinois.

112. Lucretia C. (Davis) Ramsey, 1869-70, taught in the primary department of Quincy College; 1870-1 in Rushville schools. Her address is Rushville, Illinois.

113. Jane (Pennell) Carter taught one year in Normal public schools; seven months in country schools in McLean County; three months in Bloomington schools, and one year in primary department of model school. Her address is Peru, Illinois.

114. Maria (Sykes) Nichols taught two years in Geneseo, one year in Kewanee, and was for four years principal of the Wyoming, Iowa, schools. She was married in 1876. Address, care of Austin Sykes, Kewanee, Illinois.

115. Helen (Wadleigh) Willis taught three years, one near Rutland, and two in Missouri. Her address is Neosho Falls, Kansas.

116. Ben. Allensworth was principal of the Elmwood schools, 1869-72; editor in Pekin in 1873, and taught three years in Minier. He is county superintendent of Tazewell County. His address is Minier.

117. Hugh R. Edwards was married in 1869. He taught as principal of the third ward schools, Peoria, one year; of sixth ward, one year; of third ward, Sterling, one year; and of Byron schools, one year. For three years’ he ran the Edwards’ Seminary, Sterling. The last five years he has been in the second ward school, Peoria.

118. Alfred C. Cotton, 1869-70, was principal of the Richview schools; 1870-1 of Buckley schools; 1871-3 of Gilman schools; 1873-4 of Grand Tower schools; 1874-6 of Griggsville schools. He graduated at Bush Medical College in April, 1878, and is now practicing at Turner Junction, Illinois. He is also lecturing in spring course at Rush. He was married to Miss Olive Rider.

119. Charles H. Crandell was principal of Petersburg schools one year; of ninth ward, Troy, New York, schools, five years; of Atlanta schools, one year; of Lexington, Illinois, schools, one-half year; of Hilliard, Ohio, schools, one year; of Worthington, Ohio, three years, and of Flint schools, one year. He was married in 1876, and is now in Worthington.

120. William R. Edwards taught in McLean, Illinois, three years. In the summer of 1870 he moved to Charles City, Iowa, where he married Miss Josie Bigelow. He remained there two years in the mercantile business. In 1872 he became principal of the New Hampton, Iowa, schools, remaining one year. He was for five years principal of Osage, Iowa, schools. In 1878 he resigned and returned to New Hampton, where he is in the mercantile business, and also editor of the New Hampton Courier.

121. Charles Howard.

122. Isaac F. Kleckner was married in July, 1870. For four years he was superintendent of Stephenson County. In 1870 he was elected county clerk, which position he now holds. Address, Freeport, Illinois.

123. George G. Manning, 1869-70, taught at Fulton; 1870-1 at Jacksonville, Illinois. In the summer of 1871 he was made superintendent of Peru, Indiana, schools. He is still there. In August, 1870, he was married to Lucia Kingsley.

124. George W. Mason was married in August, 1875. He was principal of Paris high school three months; of Charleston high school six months; of Kramer schools, Little Rock, one year; of Pekin high school two years; of Hannibal high school three years, and taught at Lewisburg, Arkansas, one year. Since 1878 he has been engaged in the study and practice of medicine. For a time, he was house physician in Mercy Hospital, Chicago. He is now practicing in Bloomington.

125. Charles W. Moore, 1869-72, taught in Fremont; 1872-4 was principal of Ridott schools; 1874-5 of Cedarville schools; 1875-6 of Lena schools; 1876-7 in country schools in Stephenson County; 1880-1 was principal of Storm Lake, Iowa, schools. He is now employed in the postoffice at Storm Lake. He was married in 1871.

126. Christopher D. Mowry was principal of the Pecatonica schools 1869-72, and of the Anamosa, Iowa, schools 1872-4. He then entered Rush Medical College, and graduated in 1876. To recover broken health, he spent the following year on the plains and in the mountains. For four years he practiced at Osage, Iowa. He is now in Aurora, Illinois. He was married in 1869 to Fannie E. Alderman.

127. James W. Hays in 1869-70 was principal of a grammar school in Paris, and the next year was principal of the high school in the same place. Since September, 1871, except one year when he did not teach, he has been principal of the Urbana schools.

128. Gratiot Washburn (H. S.) immediately after his graduation, he joined his father, Hon. E. B. Washburne, in Paris. He remained there most of the time until his father returned to America. He then entered the New York Custom House, and was there at last report.


CLASS OF 1870.

129. Louisa C. (Allen) Gregory was principal of the Alton high school one year, and for two years was assistant in the Peoria County Normal School. In June, 1874, she was elected professor of domestic economy in the Champaign Industrial University, which position she resigned in June, 1880, and is now in Washington, D. C. In 1879 she was married to Dr. John M. Gregory, Regent of the University.

130. Barbara Denning taught in Shawneetown in 1870-1, and in 1871-3 in Cedar Point, LaSalle County. In 1873 she went to Rosario, Argentine Confederation, as mission teacher. She will return to her home soon.

131. Alice Emmons was the daughter of Judge Sylvester Emmons and wife, and was born in Illinois in 1848. She entered school in September, 1865. Her course was interrupted by occasional terms of absence, so that she did not graduate until 1870. She began teaching in Cairo the following September, but after three weeks of school work her health failed, and, very much to the regret of the Board, she was obliged to resign. The year was spent at her home in Beardstown. The succeeding year she returned to Cairo, but after two weeks in the school room she was called to the death-bed of a dear friend. She returned to her home seriously ill, and in a few days she passed away, October 2, 1871. A brilliant scholar, thoroughly conscientious and faithful in the discharge of every duty, all had anticipated for her a future of rare usefulness. Though a decade has passed away since her death, the memory of this beautiful girl is as though but yesterday she had gone out from her schoolmates to her brief career.

132. Cara E. Higby taught 1870-1 in the Skinner school, Chicago; 1871-2 in the Blow school, St. Louis; 1872-7 in the Skinner school, again, and 1877-80 in the West Division high school, Chicago. She is now employed in the West Side high school. Her address is 374 West Jackson Street.

133. Emma A. (Howard) Gardner taught in Warrensburg, Missouri, 1870-1; in Carbondale, Illinois, 1871-2, and in Los Angeles, California, 1872-4. In January, 1874, she was married to Henry I. Gardner. Her address is Orange, California.

134. Margaret (Hunter) Regan from September, 1870, to June, 1874, taught in the Mississippi State Normal School; the last three years she was principal of the school. In 1874 she was married to L. T. Regan, of the class of 1870. Their home is Morris.

135. Maria L. (Kimberly) Perry taught two years in Warrensburg, Missouri, and one year in Fort Smith, Arkansas. She was married in 1874. Her address is 164 Canfield Street, Detroit.

136. Mary D. LeBaron, in 1870-1, taught in Oneida; 1871-2 in DeKalb County; 1872-9 in the Rolling Mills schools, Chicago, and for one year she conducted a private primary school in Chicago. She has not taught since June, 1880. Address 741 Dixon Street, Chicago.

137. Letitia (Mason) Quine, immediately after her graduation, commenced teaching in the Pontiac high school, where she remained one year. The winters of 1871-2, 1872-3, 1873-4, were spent in the Woman’s Medical College, Chicago, from which she graduated in the spring of 1874. By request of the Woman’s Foreign Missionary Society, in the fall of 1874, she went to Kin Kiang, China, to establish a medical dispensary. She remained two years, when she was obliged, by ill health, to return. She succeeded during her stay, however, in permanently establishing the dispensary. In November, 1876, she was married to Wm. E. Quine, M. D., of Chicago.

138. Adella (Nance) Shilton taught three and a half years in the aggregate, in Wethersfield, Galva, and Moline. In 1874 her eyes became so weak as to oblige her to leave the school room. In 1879 she was married to Mr. C. A. Shilton. They reside in Kewanee.

139. Adelaide V. Rutherford taught one year in Missouri, one in Texas, one in Plainview, and one in Chetopa, Kansas. In the meantime, she spent one year in Michigan University. After 1877 she was at her home in Girard, caring for her invalid mother. She remained at home until August, 1880. She then returned to Ann Arbor high school, where she expected to graduate in June, 1882, bat was compelled to leave in April on account of sickness at home.

140. Fannie (Smith) Cole, in 1870-1, taught in Paxton, and in 1871-2 in the intermediate department of Woman’s College, in Evanston. For the next two years she taught “good manners and the etiquette of occasions” in various institutions. In 1874 she became the “paying teller” in the office of the treasurer of Cook County. She remained there until her marriage to Madison B. Cole, in July, 1875. She has done some teaching since her marriage. Their present residence is Galveston, Texas.

141. Armada (Thomas) Bevan taught three years in Lincoln, one year in Jerseyville, and two years in Delavan. In 1877 she was married to John L. Bevan, of Atlanta. They have one daughter.

142. Marion (Weed) Martin taught one year in Loda, and one year in Lacon. She was married in 1872, to Irwin A. Martin, of New York. They have one daughter. Her address is 36 West Forty-Sixth Street, New York.

143. Ben. W. Baker was principal of the grammar department of the model school for four years. Since then he has been preaching. He is married, and has three children. In 1881 he went to Denver, Colorado.

144. Joseph Carter, while pursuing his studies, was for two years principal of the grammar department of the model school. After graduation, he spent two years in farming, and studied law and edited a paper for two years. He became principal of the Normal public schools in 1874, and remained in that position until June, 1878, when he resigned to accept the superintendency of the Peru schools, where he still remains. In 1870 he was married to Miss Jane E. Pennell, of the class of 1869. In addition to the above work, Mr. Carter has done a large amount of institute work in Woodford, McLean, and LaSalle Counties.

145. Robert A. Childs was principal of the Amboy schools for three years. He was admitted to the bar in 1873, and since then has been practicing in Chicago. In December, 1873, he was married to Miss Mary Coffeen. They have three children. Their home is in Hinsdale.

146. James W. Dewell, 1870-2, taught near Carrollton; 1872-3 at Barry; 1873-4 at Elm Grove; 1874-6 in Kane. In 1876 he bought a farm near Franklin, in Morgan County, and resides there. He rents his farm and teaches, having taught three years in the same school. He was married in 1872.

147. Samuel W. Garman, 1870-1, was principal of the Mississippi State Normal School, at Holly Springs. 1871-2 he taught in Lake Forrest Seminary. 1872-3 was spent in the Rocky Mountains with Prof. Cope, of the United States geological survey. Since 1873 he has been connected with the Agassiz museum, in Cambridge. He has traveled quite extensively, having spent some time in South America, especially in the Titicaca Valley. At last accounts he was engaged in “deep sea,” and similar work.

148. John W. Gibson, 1870-2, was principal of one of the schools in Belvidere. He was married several years ago. Since the summer of 1881 he has been in business.

149. Benjamin Hunter taught one year in Oneida. Subsequently he practiced law in St. Louis. Present address is unknown.

150. John W. Lummis, 1870-1, taught in Clayton; 1871-2 in Elm Grove. In the fall of 1872 he was married, and moved to a farm near LaPrairie, where they still reside. With a single exception, he taught every winter until June, 1880, since which time he has not taught. His teaching has all been done in Adams County, except in the winter of 1879-80, when he taught in Hancock County.

151. John H. Parr taught in Cedarville four years, and in Mt. Morris Seminary two years. He is now a student in the Chicago Theological Seminary.

152. Levi T. Regan was superintendent of Logan County for four years. 1874-5 he was principal of the Lincoln schools; 1875-8 of the Amboy schools, and since September, 1878, he has had charge of the Morris schools. Married Margaret Hunter, July, 1874, of same class.

153. Wade H. Richardson was married to Lydia Corbett in August 1870. He taught in Kankakee and Rantoul 1870-2. From October, 1872, to June, 1882, except one year which he spent in the south, he was principal of a ward school in Milwaukee. In 1878 his wife and one child died of diphtheria. Two daughters survive her. In the summer of 1880 he was married to Mary A. Hawley, of the class of 1873. He is now a member of the firm of Fenn, Williams & Co., booksellers, stationers, etc.

154. John W. Smith was principal of the Pontiac schools four years, and taught one year in California. For four years he was engaged in business in Pontiac and McDowell. He was employed during 1881-2 as teacher in the Illinois Reform School.

155. William Burry (H. S.) entered Harvard in 1870, and graduated in 1874. He then studied law, practiced in Chicago, and is now a member of the law firm of Isham, Lincoln & Burry, of that city.

156. Wm. H. Smith (H. S.), 1870-1, taught at Granville; 1871-3 at Tonica; 1873-4 was in business; 1874-5 taught at Farmer City. In November, 1875, he was elected county superintendent of McLean County, to fill unexpired term. He was re-elected in 1877. He was married in 1870 to Miss Nellie Galusha. He resigned the superintendency in December, 1881, to become one of the proprietors of the Saturday Evening Call, Peoria.

157. William Duff Haynie (H. S.) entered Harvard, and graduated in 1874. He studied law one year at Cairo, graduated from Wesleyan law school in June, 1876, and has since been practicing law in Bloomington.

158. Almira A. Bacon (H. S.) No report.

159. Nellie H. Galusha (H. S.) was married to W. H. Smith, and taught with him one year. Her address is Peoria.


CLASS OF 1871.

160. Charlotte (Blake) Myers, 1871-2, taught in the Carbondale schools; 1872-4 in DeKalb; 1874-8 in the Normal public schools; 1878-9 in Metamora; 1879-81 in Streator; 1881-2 in Morris. In June, 1882, she was married to Edward Myers. They reside in Streator.

161. Isabella (Huston) Tabor taught one year in Atlanta, one in Lincoln, and one in Springfield. June, 1875, she was married to Rev. Manly Tabor. Her address is Middletown, Connecticut.

162. Julia E. Kennedy was born in southern Illinois. She attended the district school and the spelling school, where she often “spelled down” all competitors, until the age of fifteen. At this time her father died, and she taught her first school in a log school house. She entered the Normal at seventeen, and graduated in 1871, valedictorian of her class. Since then she has taught in Missouri, as principal of a school in St. Louis, and as professor of rhetoric in Cape Girardeau. In 1879 she came here and took charge of the primary department.

163. Harriet (Kern) Walker taught five years in the Bloornington schools. In 1877 she was married to Mr. T. M. Walker, of Bloomington.

164. Celestia M. Mann. No report.

165. Frances I. Moroney taught in Minnesota in 1871-3. Since the spring of 1875 she has been teaching in the Bloomington, schools.

166. Frances (Rawlings) Cunningham taught in Centralia in 1871-2, and in Pekin in 1872-3, and in the Soldiers’ Orphans’ Home in 1873-4. In 1874 she was married to Dr. T. N. Cunningham. She taught one year after her marriage, in Topeka, Illinois. Her address is Sheffield, Illinois.

167. Isabel (Rugg) Reed taught one year in Odell, and two in Pontiac. In 1873 she married N. H. Reed. Their home is in Pontiac, Illinois.

168. Francis (Shaver) Thompson taught in Chicago until the great fire, and finished the year in Woodstock. In 1872-3 she taught in Pekin, and in 1873-4 in Chicago, until her marriage, which took place in December, 1873. Her address is Mrs. J. T. Thompson, 146 Twenty-Seventh Street, Chicago.

169. Emma G. Strain taught in the Bloomington schools for seven years, and finally resigned on account of ill health. Her address is Louisville, Kentucky.

170. Frances (Weyand) Latham taught three months in Somauauk, six months near Belleflower, and two in Bloomington. She was married in February, 1874, to W. A. Latham. They reside on a farm near Osman, in McLean County, Illinois.

171. W. C. Griffith, on leaving school, took charge of the Taylorville schools and retained the position for five years. In 1876 he resigned and accepted the general agency for Indiana of the Aetna Life Insurance Company. Mr. Griffith was married to Miss Elnora Libby, a high-school student, in 1871. He resides at Indianapolis.

172. Henry F. Holcomb entered the Normal School from Lake County, September, 1867, and graduated in 1871. Immediately after graduation, he commenced teaching, but after a few weeks was suddenly stricken down, and died in a few days. He was a man of unusually good health, and was full of life and physical vigor.

173. Andrew T. Lewis taught only two years. He was admitted to the bar, but has not practiced, having been engaged in publishing a newspaper most of the time since graduation. In 1879 he went west and engaged in teaching in Central City, Nevada. In 1880-1 he was principal of the Deadwood schools, and since has been in Colorado, Utah, and Montana. He is now in Urbana. Mr. Lewis was married some years ago, but lost his wife a few months after leaving Illinois.

174. T. A. H. Norman taught four years, and then took the course of study in the American Medical College, St. Louis. He practiced for a time, and then returned to teaching, having been employed for three years near Martinsville, Illinois. He was married, shortly after leaving school, to Miss Pauline Bartholdt, a lady who will be well remembered by the students of 1870-1. He has retired to a farm near Martinsville.

175. Edgar D. Plummer has taught but one year, his health having failed during his school course. He is engaged in business in Heyworth, Illinois.

176. James O. Polhemus was a classmate of the two preceding, and entered school in September, 1868. After graduation he taught in Panolia; Chester, Ohio; near Paxton, Illinois; and in Ludlow, Secor, and Gridley. At the close of his work in the last-named place he was quite ill. He had a distressing cough which soon developed into hemorrhage of the lungs. He survived the attack about a month, dying August 15, 1877. His widowed mother resides in El Paso, Illinois.

177. James R. Richardson taught in Sparta, seven months, in 1871-2; six and one-half months in Arcadia, in 1872-3; nine months in district schools, in 1873-4; seven months in district schools, near Jacksonville, in 1874-5; at Mauvaisterre, in 1875-7; at Union Grove, in 1877-8; at Woodson, in 1877-9; five months near Jacksonville, in 1879-80; at Woodson, in 1880-1; at Franklin, in 1880-2. All the above work, except the first, was done in Morgan County. In 1877 he was married to Miss Sarah M. Williams, a former student of the Normal School. His address is Jacksonville, Illinois.

178. K. Morris Waterman entered school in September, 1867, and devoted four years to his work, taking the classical course in order to fit himself for teaching the ancient languages, and graduating with the class of 1871. He spent the summer with his parents on the farm near Barrington, Illinois, and in July was appointed to the principalship of the Blue Island schools. A few days before the schools were to open he was somewhat indisposed, and the beginning of the term was deferred. He gradually failed, and in three weeks died. Mr. Waterman was an especial favorite while at school. The students of ten years ago vividly recall the quiet, unassuming gentleman with a keen sense for humor, a kindly word and willing hand for any enterprise that promised good to the school or his society—the Wrightonian. Having fitted himself for any position in the schools of the State, much was expected of him; but at the beginning of his career, standing on the verge of manhood, crowned with the love of friends and the sincere respect of all who knew him, he died.

179. John X. Wilson was principal of the sixth district in Peoria, 1871 to June, 1879. He has not taught since the latter date. Mr. Wilson was married in 1866.

180. John P. Yoder, 1871-2, was principal of the Blue Island schools; 1872-3 he was in business in Chicago; 1873-4 he taught a district school in McLean County; 1874-80 he was principal of the Danvers schools. In September, 1881, he became principal of the Bushnell schools. He is married, and has three children.

181. Alice C. Chase (H. S.) Chicago.


CLASS OF 1872.

182. Anna G. Bowen, her health not having been such as to permit her to teach continually, has taught thirteen terms, and expects to resume her work as soon as she is able. Her present address is 78 Aberdeen Street, Chicago.

183. Martha A. Fleming, from September, 1872, to June, 1876, was principal of a grammar department in the Hyde Park schools. She resigned to accept a position in the Peoria County Normal Schools, where she remained until 1878. Since that time she has been teaching in Chicago. For one year and a half, she was connected with one of the leading seminaries for young ladies—Park Institute. She resigned this position in September, 1880, and in the following month took a position in the primary department of the Oakland school, where she remains. Her address is 37 Oakwood Avenue.

184. Lenore Franklin taught in the Normal public schools for five years; in the Delevan schools for two years; in the Rockford schools part of 1876-80; in Pueblo, Colorado, schools, 1880-1, and in Princeton in 1881-82. She is now teaching in Belvidere.

185. Mary C. Furry, for three years succeeding her graduation, taught in the Normal public schools. She then taught one term in a family school; one year in the Sterling schools; two years in a country school near Sterling, and since September, 1880, she has been teaching in Sterling.

186. Clara (Gaston) Forbes taught one year in La Porte, Indiana. On Christmas day, 1873, she was married to Prof. S. A. Forbes, Director of the Laboratory of Natural History, at Normal. They have three children, two girls and one boy.

187. Anna M. Gladding entered the Normal School in September, 1868, from McLean County. She had been for some time a student in the model school, and by the singular sweetness of her disposition, and by her patient fidelity, she had won the esteem of all who knew her. She finished the course in 1872, and at once began her work as teacher, spending the first year in Vienna, Illinois. The two succeeding years she taught in district schools; in 1875-6 she did not teach, but resumed her work the succeeding year, teaching at Galva. Never robust, her strength was insufficient for the wearing life of a teacher; she therefore relinquished her position and removed to Vineland, New Jersey. Nothing was known of her ill-health until the news was received in April that she had passed away.

188. Rachel Hickey taught in Ramsey in 1872-3; in DeKalb in 1873-4, and in Bloomington in 1874-5. Since September, 1875, she has been teaching in the grammar grades of the Indianapolis schools. Her address is 48 Cherry Street.

189. Sara C. Hunter has taught in the Lakeview schools constantly since her graduation. Her address is Englewood, Illinois.

190. Alza (Karr) Blount taught in Atlanta, Illinois, 1873-4, and in Forreston, 1874-6. In August, 1874, she was married to George Blount, of the same class. They reside in Macomb.

191. Martha G. Knight, from September, 1872, to June, 1879, taught constantly. The first four years she taught part of the time in country schools, and the remainder of the time in Henry, and in Bloomington. From September, 1876, to June, 1879, she taught in the Bloomington city schools. She did not teach in 1879-80, but is now principal of the Clear Creek school, in Putnam County.

192. Julia F. (Mason) Parkinson entered the model school when quite young, her parents having moved to Normal to educate their children. She entered the Normal Department in September, 1869, and graduated with the class of 1872. The year after her graduation she was principal of the Winchester high school. The succeeding year she was first assistant in the Lincoln high school. In September, 1874, she took charge of the model department of the Southern Illinois Normal School, where she remained until December 28, 1876, when she was married to Prof. D. B. Parkinson, of the same institution. For some years her health had not been very good, and in the summer of 1876 her husband took her to the mountains of the west, hoping, at least, to prolong her life. At first she seemed benefited by the change, but she soon began to fail, and died in August, 1878, at San Jose, California, leaving one son.

193. Emma A. Monroe, 1872-3, taught in Virginia, Illinois, and 1873-5 in Bloomington. From June, 1875, to September, 1878, she did not teach. In September of the last named year, she resumed her work, and has been employed constantly in the Bloomington city schools.

194. Julia (Moore) Byerly has not taught. At least, no report has been received.

195. Mary Y. Osburn, 1872-3, taught in the Lebanon schools;1873-4 was principal in the primary department of Elleardville school, St. Louis; 1874-5 first assistant in the same school; 1875-6 rested; 1877-82 in the same school. In March, 1882, she was promoted to the Everett school.

196. Flora Pennell was born in Putnam, the smallest county in Illinois, in the town of Granville, which, in the early history of the State, was one of the centers of education. She began attending school at the age of four, and has not been out of school (either as a pupil or a teacher) any whole year since. At the age of twelve she moved to Normal, and entered the grammar school of the University. She entered the Normal in the fall of 1869, and graduated in 1872. The next year she taught a country school, one mile west of Bloomington. In the fall of 1873 she went to Vassar College, and in the year 1874 she became an assistant in the high school at Elgin, Illinois, where she remained for three years. From Elgin she came to teach in the Normal Department in the fall of 1877.

197. Alice B. Phillips, 1872-5, taught in the Normal public schools. She has not taught since June, 1879. Her address is 88 Fort Greene Place, Brooklyn.

198. Louisa Ray taught in St. Joseph, Missouri, in 1872-4; in 1874-8 she was head assistant in the Peoria County Normal School. She was an invalid for two years. Since September, 1881, she has taught in Oakland high school.

199. Alpha Stewart taught in Stanford in 1872-3; in Oak Grove in 1873-5; in Mount Hope in 1875-6; in Oak Grove in 1876-7; in Mount Hope in 1877-9 ; in Normal in 1879-81. She is now teaching at Atlanta.

200. Gertrude (Town) Beggs was assistant in the Henry schools in 1872-3; she was employed in the Bloomington city schools in 1873-5 ; she was assistant in the Wilmington high school in 1875-6. In September, 1875, she was married to Robert H. Beggs of the same class. They reside in Denver, Colorado, where she is teaching.

201. Edith (Ward) Roache taught one year in Elgin, two in Hyde Park, and one in California. She was married in 1877. Her home is in Watson Valley, California.

202. Robert H. Beggs, 1872-5, was principal of the Virginia, Illinois, schools, and 1875-80 of the Wilmington schools. Since September, 1880, he has been principal of a ward school in Denver, Colorado.

203. George Blount, 1872-3, was principal of the Adeline schools; 1873-7 of the Forreston schools; 1877-8 of the Lexington schools; and since September, 1879, has had charge of the Macomb schools. August, 1874, he was married to Miss Alza Karr, of the same class.

204. James M. Greeley was principal of the Elmwood schools 1872-3. 1873-6 he taught winter schools aggregating fourteen months. His health failing, he went to Kansas, and in October, 1879, he was elected county treasurer of Saline County. His address is Saline.

205. Frank W. Hullinger taught two years in Bloom, Cook County, one year in Granville, and one year in Homewood. He studied in Oberlin College, and Chicago Theological Seminary, and in July, 1879, was ordained and began the work of the ministry. He was pastor of a church in Dundee, Michigan, for two years, and is now pastor of the Congregational church, in Milton, Rock County. He was married in December, 1873.

206. Elisha W. Livingston spent 1872-3 in Beloit College. He was principal of the schools in Caledonia station for four years. His failing health obliged him to resign. Since 1879 he has taught two terms, and is now farming.

207. Thomas L. McGrath taught one year in Litchfield, one in Equality, and one in Butler. He is now city attorney in Mattoon.

208. Samuel W. Paisley was born in Golconda, Illinois, in 1840. Orphaned at the early age of three years, he was reared by an uncle. His early life was devoted to manual labor, and his circumstances were such that he enjoyed few opportunities for educating himself. His ardent nature responded to the call for volunteers, and although very young, he entered the Union army. After the close of the war, he attended the academy at Friendsville, and for several years thereafter alternately taught and attended school, striving, with characteristic energy, to fit himself for his chosen profession. In September, 1868, he entered the Illinois Normal School, and graduated with his class in 1872. During his life as a student he won the high esteem and confidence of his instructors and fellow-students. He enthusiastically identified himself with every noble enterprise. No student ever responded to the roll call of his alma mater who lived upon a higher plane than he. Scrupulously faithful to every requirement, brilliantly successful in his studies, loving and tender in his nature, he was fitted as few men or women are, to perform the delicate and difficult task of teaching the young. Immediately after graduation, he was appointed principal of the Watseka schools, having been united in marriage in August, 1872, to Miss Helen Clute, of Normal. Into his work he threw all the devotion and enthusiasm of his loyal heart. His ambition was unsatisfied with the mere teaching of text-book facts, and he aimed to impress upon his pupils the lessons of gentleness, reverence for the true and beautiful, and obedience to the highest promptings of their natures. His success was abundant. Like every true teacher, he was an indefatigable student. Upon the foundation acquired at school, he was steadily building a broad and liberal education, thus fitting himself for whatever position might await him. After four years of intensely active work at Watseka, he took charge of the Lexington schools. With a kind of fierce energy he threw heart and soul into the duties of his new position. The sequel could have been forecast with almost unerring precision. After three or four months of labor, he was suddenly prostrated with hemorrhage of the lungs. He relinquished his position, and returned to Normal, the home of his wife’s mother. Here he slowly rallied, and regained so much of his original strength as to take charge of two of the classes in the Normal School. But he was unequal to the task, and the dreadful hemorrhage returned about the first of November. Hoping to stay the progress of the disease, he went to the mountain region about Chattanooga, Tennessee, and for a time seemed to gain strength in the bracing atmosphere, his last letter, addressed to President Hewett, was full of hope and good cheer, but on the morning of February 4, all were shocked by the unexpected tidings of his sudden death. His funeral took place at Normal on February 7, and was attended by a large number of students and friends. His remains were gently laid to rest under the trees of the sad city of the dead. Thus upon the threshold of a noble career, with a heart full of hope and love and good will to men, with his eager face aflame with high aspiration and courage, he halted, and laying aside the garb of the toiler, obeyed the summons of the Master, and “entered into rest.”

209. Frank E. Ritchey taught two years in Milwaukee and one in Illinois. He commenced the practice of law in St. Louis, but received such flattering propositions to relinquish this business that he left St. Louis in 1879, and is now engaged in stock business in Ford County. His address is Campus, Illinois. He was married in 1879.

210. Espy L. Smith was principal of the Granville schools in 1872-3; of the Camp Point schools in 1873-4; of the Wenona schools in 1874-5; of the Minonk schools in 1875-9. He spent a year on a farm and is now studying medicine in a Homeopathic College in Chicago.

211. John H. Stickney was principal of the Altona schools from 1872 to 1877, five years, and of the West Side schools in St. Charles for three years. In September, 1880, he again took charge of the Altona schools, where he is at present.

212. William R. Wallace entered from McLean County in April, 1808, and graduated with the class of 1872. The succeeding year he was principal of the Piper City schools, and in 1872-3 he held a similar position in Pinkneyville. His health, never good, warned him to leave teaching, so he went into the drug business, first in Bloomington, and subsequently in Heyworth. His health grew gradually worse, however, and in December, 1876, he died. His parents reside near Hudson.

213. James M. Wilson was principal of the Bloomington, Indiana, schools, for three years. In September, 1875, he entered upon his duties as professor of mathematics in the Indiana State formal School, at Terre Haute, which position he occupied until June, 1881. In August, 1873, he was married to Miss Sallie Tomlinson, an undergraduate of the Illinois Normal.

214. Edwin F. Bacon had nearly completed his studies in 1865, when he left school and went to New York City. He taught there in 1865-6. For two years, 1866-8, he had charge of a large school in Norwalk, Connecticut. In the fall of 1868 he entered the scientific department of Yale College, and graduated in 1871. He taught Latin and German, in Wilmington, for one year. In 1872 he received his diploma from this Normal School, and shortly after he went to Germany and studied and taught two years. In 1873 he returned to New York, and has since been engaged in teaching German, in which he has become very successful. His address is box 296, Jersey City.

215. Charles D. Mariner was principal of the Byron schools two years, of the Marengo schools one year, of the Durand schools three years. He taught, also, a country school one year. Since June, 1880, he has taught twelve months in Winnebago Township. He was married in 1871. His address is Winnebago.

216. Chalmers Rayburn (H. S.) taught in Vienna, Illinois, two months, in Sperry, Iowa, four months, in McLean County one year, in Hudson two years, and at Money Creek two years. His address is Towanda.

217. Newton B. Reid (H. S.) taught two years at St. Paul and Albion, Illinois. He is now practicing law in Bloomington, Illinois.


CLASS OF 1873.

218. Lura (Bullock) Elliott, during the spring term of 1874, taught near Tonica; 1874-5 was principal of primary department, Tonica; 1875-6 was principal of Tonica schools; 1877-8 was assistant in Macomb high school. She was married in 1879, and is now living on a farm near Tonica.

219. Mary M. Cox taught one year at Belleville, one year at Greenville, California, and five years at Watsonville, twenty miles from Santa Cruz. In the summer of 1881 she went to Europe, where she is still studying. Her address is number 14 Wieser Strasse, Hanover, Germany.

220. Ellen S. Edwards taught one year at Lexington, five months in Rock River Seminary, and was for two years assistant in Normal School. In September, 1877, she entered the Boston School of Orators and completed the course in 1879. Her address is Princeton.

221. Ida. L. Foss taught six months at Homer, and for three years was assistant in Rossville high school. Since September, 1877, she has had charge of the high school at Rushville.

222. Mary (Hawley) Richardson taught six months in Naples, one year in Beardstown, and five years in Milwaukee. In August, 1880, she was married to W. H. Richardson, of Milwaukee.

223. H. Amelia Kellogg, after graduation, taught constantly in Chicago until November, 1881. Her health failed, and she went to Texas. She is at San Antonio. Her address was 29 Oak Avenue, Chicago.

224. L. Erne Peter, immediately after graduation, went to San Juan, California, and taught near that place one year. 1874-5 was teacher in the grammar school in Mason City; 1876-7 assistant in the high school at same place; 1877-9 was first assistant in Lincoln high school; 1880-1 taught in Larned, Kansas; and since, has been teaching in Cimarron, Kansas.

225. Anna V. Sutherland taught the Mt. Prospect school two years, taught in Bloomington two terms, in Heyworth one year, and in LeRoy two years. Her address is LeRoy.

226. Mary I. Thomas, for three years taught at Atlanta. She has not taught since.

227. Emma (Warne) Hall, 1873-4, was assistant in DeKalb; 1874-5 was principal of Blackberry schools. Her health failing, she did not teach again until January, 1877, when she took charge of a grammar school at DeKalb. She was married in 1877 to E. Hall, superintendent of the S., O. & C. R. R. She resides at Sycamore.

228. L. P. Brigharn was principal of the Tolono schools in 1873-4; of the Arcola schools 1875-7. He then studied one year at Indianapolis. In 1878-81 he was principal of Farmer City schools. He was married in 1878. In 1881-2 he attended Rush Medical College.

229. Charles DeGarmo was born in the State of Wisconsin in 1849. At the age of two his parents moved to Sterling, Ill., where he lived ten years. Afterward he lived at Lebanon, St. Clair County, Illinois. He enlisted in the army at the age of sixteen, and served one year. He saw all the great battle fields of Georgia, one year after the battles. He entered the Normal University in the fall of 1870, and graduated in the spring of 1873. He was married in 1875 to Miss Ida Witbeck, of Belvidere, Ill., who was for two years a student in the University. He has worked in institutes for eight years. At various times he has done institute work in Shelby, Jo Daviess, Lee, Fayette, and McLean Counties: also, in the State of Iowa.

230. Jasper T. Hays was married in December, 1875. In 1873-4 he taught in Whiteside county; in 1874-6 in Lee county; in 1876-7 in Morrison and Delhi; 1877-8 taught four months in country school; 1870-81 taught in Kansas. He is now farming. His address is Elivan, Kansas.

231. E. R. E. Kimbrough taught at Golconda in 1873-4, and is now practicing law in Danville. In 1878 he wrote: “One boy eight months old, a few briefs, and a Democratic nomination for State Senate, Thirty-First district.” He was defeated for Senator, although receiving a very complimentary vote, his district being strongly Republican.

232. George W. Lecrone taught three months at Moccasin and was principal of East Side schools at Effingham one year. He then served as deputy clerk of Effingham County. He is now publishing a paper at Effingham, Illinois.

233. Walter C. Lockwood married Elizabeth Peers in 1874. He was three years in the hardware business in Ottawa, two years on a farm near Rankin, taught one winter near Rankin, and went to Kansas in 1879, where he is engaged in the hardware business. His address is Marion Center. He paid his tuition in full, after graduation.

234. DeWitt C. Roberts married Miss Fannie Pace in July, 1875. He was principal of Beardstown schools 1873-6, professor of mathematics at Cape Girardeau Normal School 1876-80, and is now principal of Broadway school, Denver, Colorado.

235. Arthur Shores taught six months in Minnesota, three months in Glencoe, in that State, nine months in Taylor’s Falls, and six months in district school in Tazewell County. He is now practicing law in Minneapolis, Minnesota, 921 Eighth Avenue.

236. John B. Stoutemyer continued studies two years. He taught one month at Covel, and two months near Bloomington. He is now farming two miles west of Bloomington.

237. Felix B. Tait taught one year at Woodstock Seminary, and was admitted to the bar in June, 1876. He is practicing in Decatur, Illinois.

238. J. Lawson Wright, 1873-6, was principal of Adeline schools; 1876-80 of Forreston schools; 1880-1 of Savanna schools; 1881-2 of Cedarville schools.

239. M. Louise Abraham (H. S.) has taught constantly since graduation. 1873-5 in Spencer, Indiana; 1875-7 in Illinois, near Oilman; 1877-8 in Spencer; and since September, 1878, in Edinburg, Indiana.

240. Edmund J. James was born May 21, 1855, at Jacksonville, Morgan County, Illinois. His parents settled on a farm near Normal, in 1863. He entered the lowest class of the grammar school in the model department of State Normal in the spring of 1866. He remained in the model department six years and one term, graduating from the high school in 1873. He then spent two terms in the classical department of the Northwestern University, at Evanston. After holding a position for one season (six months) in one of the field parties of the U. S. Lake survey, he went to Harvard College in October, 1874, and remained one year, making a specialty of the classics. He went to Germany in August, 1875, attended the universities of Berlin and Halle, studying history, political science, and philosophy. He graduated at Halle in August, 1877, with the degrees of A. M. and Ph. D. He then took charge of the Evanston high school, January 1, 1878, and entered on his present work in September, 1879. He is turning his attention to political economy, and is one of the contributors to the Encyclopedia of Political Science, now being published.

241. J. Dickey Templeton (H. S.) worked in the State museum for a few months. Since 1875 he has been employed in a bank in Bloomington.


CLASS OF 1874.

242. Emily Alden taught in Loda in 1874-5. In 1875-6 she was principal of schools in Princeville. She did not teach in 1870-7. In 1877-8 she taught in Kent, Iowa, and since 1878 she has taught in Afton in the same State.

243. Lida (Brown) McMurry taught in Sublette in 1874-6; in Arcola in 1876-7; in Clear Creek in 1877-8; and two months in Decatur in 1878-9. In the summer of 1878 she was married to Wm. P. McMurry, of the same class. Their home is in Normal.

244. Eunice Corwine taught in the country near Lincoln in 1874-8. Since 1878 she has been teaching in the Lincoln schools.

245. S. Alice Judd has been employed constantly as assistant in the Decatur high school since her graduation.

246. Sarah M. Littlefield was principal of the Rushville high school in 1874-5; she taught in the Beardstown schools in 1875-6, she was again principal of the Rushville high school in 1876-7, and in 1877-8 she again taught in the Beardstown schools; she taught in the Galva schools in 1878-9, since which time she has not taught. Her address is Beardstown.

247. Mary (McWilliams) Burford taught in Logan County in 1874-5, and in Fanner City in 1875-6 and 1877-8. She did not teach in 1876-7 on account of poor health. In September, 1879, she was married to Will F. Burford, of Farmer City, where they now reside.

248. M. Ella Morgan has taught continuously since graduation, in Washington, D. C. Her address is 1114 Tenth Street.

249. Elizabeth (Peers) Lockwood has not taught. In September following her graduation she was married to Walter C. Lockwood, of the class of 1873. She discharged her obligation by paying her tuition in full. Her home is in Marion Centre, Kansas.

250. Emma Y. (Stewart) Brown entered school in September, 1870. One year was spent in teaching during the course, so that she did not graduate until June, 1874. She taught in Rochelle in 1874-5; in Peru, Indiana. 1875-6, and 1876-8 in Wichita, Kansas. August 9, 1868, she was married to I. Eddy Brown, of the same class, and removed, to Decatur, where Mr. Brown was employed as principal of the high school. Her wedded life was brief. August 1,1880, a little less than two years from the time of her marriage, she died of puerperal fever. She left a babe, but it survived her only a few weeks. The closing days of her life were singularly beautiful. Conscious of approaching death, she arranged all of her affairs with the serenity and fortitude of the hero of a hundred fields. Loving life as only the young blessed with all that is beautiful can love it, she submitted to the inevitable with calm composure, and even greeted it with a happy smile.

251. Maggie (Woodruff) Evans, 1874-6, taught in Savannah, Illinois. In 1876 she was married to William A. Evans, of the same class. Her address is Leavenworth, Kansas.

252. I. Eddy Brown immediately after graduation was elected principal of the Decatur high school. He retained this position until June, 1880, when he resigned to accept the State Secretaryship of the Y. M. C. A. In August, 1878, he was married to Emma V. Stewart, a sketch of whom is given above.

253. Francis W. Conrad, the first year after graduation taught in the Maine State Normal School. Warned by failing health, in the summer of 1875 he went to California, where he has been teaching constantly since. In September, 1877, he was elected principal of the Montecito schools, Santa Barbara, which position he still retains.

254. John N. Dewell, 1874-5, was principal of the Barry schools; 1875-8 of the Litchfield schools, and 1878-81 of the Hillsboro schools. His present address is Bloomington, where he is in the insurance and real estate business.

255. David S. Elliott, 1874-5, was principal of the Caseyville schools. In 1875 he joined the Methodist Conference and preached for a while, teaching, in the meantime, four mouths in Mackinaw, three months in Groveland, and two months in a private school. 1878-9 he was assistant in the Centralia schools. 1879-81 was principal of the same schools. He is now principal of the Bunsen school, Belleville, Illinois.

256. William A. Evans, since graduation, has taught two years in Illinois, and four in Kansas. At present he is teacher of history and natural science in the Leavenworth high school.

257. Thomas E. Jones, 1874-6, taught in Troy, Kansas; 1876-8 he was principal of the Mt. Pleasant, Missouri, schools; 1878-9 he had charge of the Hillsdale, Kansas, schools; 1879-80 he spent as a traveling salesman, 1880-1 he was again principal of the Hillsdale schools, where he is at present.

258. William P. McMurry has not taught. He studied law, was admitted, spent a few months in Texas, and then returned to Normal. He is now employed in the office of the Phoenix nursery, Bloomington.

259. Elinzer H. Prindle, 1874-6, taught in Centreville. 1876-8 he was principal of the White Hall schools. In the summer of 1878 he removed to Kansas, and engaged in farming and stock-raising. In November, 1879, he was elected county clerk of Hodgernan County. He is now teaching in Lamed, Kansas.

260. Carlton H. Rew, 1874-7, was principal of the Pontiac schools, and 1877-9 of the Fairbury schools. 1779-80 was spent in study. Since September, 1880, he has had charge of the Wilmington schools. In 1878 he was married to Miss Ada Casley, an undergraduate of the Normal School.

261. William J. Simpson has taught six years since graduation, most of the time in country schools. He is now farming near Sigel. Mr. Simpson has been married twice. His first wife, whom Normalites of 1873 will remember as Alice Buchanan, died in 1877. He was married again in 1880.

262. Harry A. Smith, 1874-5, was principal of the Lena schools, and 1875-8 of the Rock Falls schools. In 1878 he entered the ministry, and is now in charge of the Baptist Church, in Tampico.

263. Jasper N. Wilkinson, 1874-9, was principal of the Buda schools. 1879-80 he was principal of one of the ward schools in Peoria. Since September, 1880, he has been principal of the Decatur high school. He was married in Buda, in 1879.

264. Adele (Cook) Sample was married to A. Sample in September, 1875. Her address is Paxton, Illinois.


CLASS OF 1875.

265. Margarita McCullough, 1875-6 taught in Edinburg, Indiana. She has since taught at South Evanston, having lost but one day since graduation.

266. Josephine McHugh, 1875-7, except spring term, was assistant in the Galena high school. The spring term of 1877 she taught in Omaha; 1877-80 in Warren; 1880-1 in Shellsburg; 1881-2 in Dwight. She is now teaching in Bloomington.

267. Florence Ohr, with the exception of the spring term of 1881, when she attended the Normal, has taught constantly in the Soldiers’ Orphans’ Home since graduation.

268. Henrietta Watkins taught a short time—a few weeks—in Decatur. She is now at home in Normal.

269. Mary A. Watkins has not taught. Her address is Normal.

270. David Ayers, 1875-6, taught a district school near Sweetwater; 1876-7 taught near Elkhart; 1877-81 was in charge of the Sweetwater schools. He married Miss Anna Martin in November, 1881. He is now in business. His address is 734 Forty-Third Street, Chicago.

271. Robert L. Barton, 1875-7, was principal of Mound City schools; 1877-8 he taught four months at Farmer City; 1878-81 at Rossville. He has since been superintendent of the Galena schools.

272. Albert D. Beckhart, 1875-7, taught in Cerro Gordo; 1877-8 in Buffalo, Sangamon County. He was married in December, 1876, to Miss Jennie H. Baker. In 1877 he joined the Illinois Annual Conference, and is now preaching. He is located at Nilwood.

273. Lewis O. Bryan, 1875-6, taught in Salem; 1876-9 in Van Buren, Arkansas. He was admitted to the bar in February, 1880, and is now practicing at Van Buren, Arkansas.

274. W. T. Crow has not taught. He is postmaster at Cotton Hill, and proprietor of Sugar Creek mills.

275. James Ellis was principal of Winnebago schools, 1875-6; 1876-7 he taught four months in Boone County; 1877-80 was again principal of Winnebago schools. Since September, 1880, he has been principal of the high schools at Sharon, Wisconsin.

276. Judd M. Fiske taught one year, 1875-6, at Armington, Illinois, and two years at Naples. He married Miss Harriet A. Hunter. For two years he taught in district schools. 1880-1 he taught at Ridott, and is now teaching there.

277. Justin L. Hartwell was principal of the Dixon schools in 1875-7; 1877-8 ran a business college at Dixon; 1878-80 was principal of Odell school. He has since been principal of Barry, Illinois, schools. He was married in 1873.

278. Josiah P. Hodge taught six months. His business is law and real estate. Address, Golconda, Illinois.

279. U. Clay McHugh was born in Monroe County, Ohio, July 10, 1850. He entered school from McLean County, January, 1872, and graduated in June, 1875. In 1875-6 he taught in Pleasant Hill. During the summer of 1876 he entered Rush Medical College, Chicago, and remained there until March, 1877, when he returned to his home in Lexington, and taught a further term of three months, continuing his medical studies meanwhile. In the summer of 1877 he returned to Rush, and graduated in February, 1878. He returned to his home, but was stricken down by sudden illness, and died July 11, 1878.

280. W. S. Mills, 1875-6, was principal of the grammar department of the model school; 1876-80 of a ward school at Joliet. In May, 1882, he graduated from the law department of Columbia College. His address is 73 Pine Apple Street, Brooklyn.

281. James N. Mosher, 1875-6, taught near Odell; 1876-7 he had charge of the Watson, Missouri, schools; 1877-8 of the Van Buren, Arkansas, schools; 1878-9 he did not teach; 1879-80 of the Watson schools. Since September, 1880, he has been principal of the Edwardsville schools, Kansas.

282. John L. Shearer taught at Rockport in 1875-6; taught a country school near St. Louis in 1876-7; a country school in Henry County in 1877-8; was principal of the White Hall schools in 1878-9. He has since been principal of Napa City schools.

283. Benjamin F. Stocks was married in 1875. In 1875-6 he was principal of Bethallo schools; 1876-7 of Fairmount schools; 1877-9 of Sullivan schools; 1879-80 of La Moille schools; 1880-2 of Cerro Gordo schools.

284. Ann S. Wheaton (H. S.), after graduating, went to Montreal to study French. She returned to Normal in 1876 and continued her studies one year, when she went to Yreka, California. After teaching a private school for a short time, she became a teacher in the public schools. She purchased a home in 1880.

285. Nicholas T. Edwards (H. S.) graduated at Knox in 1879, and taught in Dover one year. He studied Theology in the Chicago Theological Seminary and is now preaching. He may be reached by addressing Princeton, Illinois.

286. Frank W. Gove (H. S.) graduated at Dartmouth in 1878. For six months he was professor of mathematics in Colorado State University. He is now surveying in the mountains of Colorado. He was married in July to Miss Ida Cook. His address is Rico, Colorado.

287. Emrich B. Hewitt (H. S.) entered the high school in 1871, from Forreston, Illinois, and graduated with his class in 1875. He entered Harvard University in September, 1875, and remained one year, when failing health obliged him to give up his college work and endeavor to regain his strength. He remained at his home, in Freeport, for a few months, but failing to receive any benefits from medical attendance, he went to Colorado, hoping that a change of climate might prove beneficial. He gradually declined, however, and finally died in March, 1879. Universally esteemed, ambitious to excel as a scholar, and surrounded with all that tends to make life desirable, his early death was peculiarly sad.


CLASS OF 1876.

288. Mary L. Bass, since graduation, has been teaching in Oakland school. Her address is 3655 Vincennes Avenue, Chicago.

289. Louisa C. Larrick, in the fall of 1876, taught at Gibson; 1878-9 at Middletown, Virginia. She has since been teaching at Pontiac, Illinois.

290. Amanda M. Fusey, 1876-80, taught in Champaign; 1880-1 she taught in Ottawa, Kansas. She has since taught at Neosho, Missouri.

291. George H. Beatty taught six months near Clinton, six months in Midland City, six months near Clinton. 1879-81 he was principal of the Heyworth schools. He is now at Maroa.

292. Daniel S. Buterbaugh, 1876-7, taught at Money Creek; 1877-9 at Camargo and Pesotum; 1879-80 near Clinton. Since 1880 he has been principal of the Danvers schools.

293. William H. Chamberlain, 1876-9, taught at Ridge Farm, Illinois; 1879-80 he studied at Normal; 1880-1 at Ridge Farm. Since 1881 he has been principal of the Rossville schools.

294. Asbury M. Crawford, 1876-7, taught in Mechanicsville; in 1877-8 he studied law in Bloomington. He then went west, and is now in the nursery business at Helena, Montana.

295. George W. Dinsmore taught one year in Shelbyville, Tennessee, and one year in Illinois. His health would not permit of further teaching, he went west, settling at Lyons, Kansas, and engaging in the hardware business, he married Carrie Wallace, in Houston, Texas.

296. Lewis C. Dougherty, 1876-8, taught at Lacon; 1878-9 taught four months in Rising, Neb. Since September, 1879, he has been principal of the Minonk schools.

297. J. Calvin Hanna, taught one year in Toulon, three months near Monica, Peoria County, two months in Wooster, Ohio. He graduated from Wooster College in June, 1881, and has since been teaching in the Columbus, Ohio, high school.

298. Benjamin S. Hedges was born in Virginia, in 1852. He entered the Normal School in September, 1873, and graduated with the class of 1876. He secured a State certificate about the time of his graduation. Shortly after graduation, he was appointed principal of the Rochelle high school. A part of the summer of 1876 was spent at the Centennial Exposition. He returned to his home in the early fall, expecting to begin his work, but contracted typhoid fever in the home of a friend, who died of the same disease, and passed away October 1, 1876, at the age of twenty-four years, five months and twenty-seven days. He was a young man of high character and great promise.

299. Charles L. Howard, 1876-7, was principal of the Farmington schools; 1877-8 was agent for Johnson’s Cyclopedia; 1878-9 was principal of the Centralia schools; 1879-81 of the Shelbyville schools. He is now principal of the Madison school, St. Louis.

300. John T. Johnson, 1876-8, was principal of the Millersburg school; in 1879 he taught a few months near Bloomington. He then went into the hedge business. In 1880-1 taught eight months in New Boston. Since September, 1881, he has been principal of the fifth ward school, Peoria.

301. Claudius B. Kinyon has not taught. Graduating from a medical college in 1878, he has since been practicing in Rock Island.

302. Joseph F. Lyon, 1876-7, taught in Kansas; 1877-8 in Cumberland County; 1878-9 traveled and studied; 1879-80 taught in Altamont. Since September, 1880, he has been principal of the Odell school.

303. Truman B. Mosher taught seven months in a country school in Livingston County; 1877-8 taught at Sullivan Center; 1878-9 at Grouse, Kane County; 1879-80 in Livingston County. Since September, 1880, he has been teaching in Cherryvale, Kansas.

304. DeWitt C. Tyler taught two years at New Boston, and one year at Millersburg. He now practices medicine in Clifton, Kansas.

305. Leroy B. Wood is secretary and treasurer of the Plano Manufacturing Company, Plano, Illinois.

306. Arabella D. Loer (H. S.) is in Mexico, Missouri.

307. Charles A. McMurry (H. S.), 1876-7, continued his studies at Ann Arbor; 1877-8 taught at Armington; 1878-9 at Clear Creek; 1879-80 at Clifton for five months, returning to Ann Arbor in the spring; 1880-81 taught at Littleton, California; 1881-2 in Denver, Colorado. He is now in the University of Halle, Germany, making a specialty of political economy.


CLASS OF 1877.

308. Mary A. Anderson has taught in the Bloomington high school since graduation. Her address is 605 West Front Street.

309. Agnes E. Ball, 1877-8, taught near Girard; 1878-80 in Girard; 1880-1 in Virden; 1881-2 in a district school near Girard, Montgomery County.

310. Emma E. Corbett has been teaching at Milwaukee constantly since graduation.

311. Nettie (Cox) Smith, 1878-9, taught in Hudson; 1879-81 in a district school near Hudson. She was married in 1881.

312. Adeline M. Goodrich, is traveling in the interest of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union. Her address is Freeport, Illinois.

313. Anna L. Martin, 1878-9, taught near Washburn; 1879-81 in the Normal public schools. She was married in the fall of 1881, to David Ayers. Her address is 734 Forty-Third Street, Chicago.

314. Selina M. Regan taught a district school three months; 1878-9 she taught the same school six and one-half months. Since January, 1880, she has taught in Morris, Illinois.

315. Laura A. Varner, 1877-9, taught in country schools near Freeburg. 1879-80 she taught in Marissa. She has since been principal of the Marissa schools.

316. Wilmas (Varner) Metzger, 1877-8, taught four months in Marion County. In April, 1878, she moved to California, and taught constantly until her marriage to J. E. Metzger, in November, 1880. Her address is Healdsburg, California.

317. Emily Wing spent two years at Wellesley College, taught one year in Collinsville, and one year in the Female Academy, at Jacksonville. Her address is Collinsville.

318. Levi D. Berkstresser is employed in banking and the clothing trade. His address is Buda, Illinois.

319. W. Irving Berkstresser, 1877-8, taught in Bryant’s Commercial College, Chicago. He is now preaching in Decatur.

320. Richard G. Bevan taught, 1877-8, in a district school six months; 1878-9 in the same school six months, and 1881-2 he taught six months near Atlanta.

321. Edward E. Faulkner has been principal of the Frankfort, Kansas, schools, since graduation.

322. Hiram E. Fowler has taught in Cave-in-Rock constantly since graduation.

323. Frank B. Harcourt taught part of 1877-8 in Logan County. In 1878 he returned to Normal and finished the high school course. His address is Chestnut, Illinois.

324. George L. Hoffman was married in 1879 and is practicing law at Mt. Sterling, Illinois.

325. Albert Swan taught in Toulon in 1877-8; in N. Wyoming in 1878-80; in Castleton, Illinois, in 1880-2.

326. Levi Spencer taught during the summer term of 1878, and winter term of 1878-9, in Piatt County; summer term of 1879 in Macon County; then two terms Piatt County. He has since taught at Oronogo, Missouri.

327. Edward E. Levett is practicing law in Chicago. His address is 132 LaSalle Street.

328. Sarah (Coolidge) White (H. S.) was married in the fall of 1879. Her address is Springfield.

329. Jennette Kingsley’s (H. S.) parents moved to Normal when she was a little child. She entered the lowest department, and completed the course, graduating from high school with the class of 1877. After a few months of rest, she became a teacher in the Normal public school, and remained there until June, 1879. Very soon after the close of school she went to Denver, in order to be present at the competitive examination of teachers in that city. Brilliantly successful, she received an appointment, and in September commenced her work. She had been in the school room but a few weeks when she was stricken down with the dreadful typhus fever, and survived but a few days. Her body was brought back to her old home, and laid to rest in the cemetery at Bloomington. Miss Kingsley was one of those to whom nature had been peculiarly generous. Possessing an unusually sunny disposition, superior intellectual attainments, rare personal beauty, and the rarer gift of a devout and loving heart, she won the respect and affectionate regard of all with whom she came in contact.

330. Sabina F. Mills (H. S.) taught nine months in Granville, and three months near Mt. Palatine. Since June, 1879, he has taught in El Dorado, Kansas.

331. Laura Sudduth (H. S.) is at Wellesley College, and will graduate in 1883. Her address is Normal.

332. Fremont C. Blandin (H. S.) was at Ann Arbor in 1877-9. He since graduated from the Wesleyan law school. His address is Rutland, Illinois.

333. George A. Franklin (H. S.) taught in Butler in 1877-9; was for some time foreman of a printing office in Rockford; is now running a cattle ranch at Forest City, Iowa.

334. Theodore T. Hewitt (H. S.) is in a bank at Freeport, Illinois.


CLASS OF 1878.

335. Mary M. Baird, 1878-9, taught at Naples. Ill health compelled her to rest until 1880, since which time she has taught at Mendota, Illinois.

336. Evangeline (Candy) Mitchell taught at Chestnut, Illinois, one year. Her present address is Arcola, Illinois.

337. Jessie (Dexter) Benton taught one year at Lexington. She was married in the summer of 1879.

338. Eugenia Faulkner taught in the Frankfort, Kansas, high school two years, and has since taught at Marysville, Kansas.

339. Flora M. Fuller, 1878-9, taught in the Carrollton high schools. She is now teaching in the Millersburg schools.

340. Sarah C. Martin, 1879-80, taught at Washburn, and in 1881-2 in the same place.

341. Ida (Philbrick) Gaston taught three months in Baileyville. She married Frank Gaston, of Normal, in December, 1879.

342. Frances Preston entered the Normal School from Lee County, in September, 1875, and graduated in 1878, taking the full Latin and Greek course. The year 1878-9 she taught in Centralia. In September, 1880, she commenced work in the Mendota schools, west side, and remained there until the following spring, when failing health compelled her to resign. She returned to her home in Amboy, but she rapidly declined, and died May 3. She had an intense desire to acquire knowledge, and doubtless hastened her death by over-study and severe exertion as a teacher. She possessed an unusual amount of individuality and originality, and by her careful preparation was especially fitted to occupy a conspicuous position. Her ample success as a teacher indicated that if her life had been spared she would not have disappointed the high hopes of her many friends.

343. Florence Richardson entered school in September, 1875, and graduated with her class in 1878. Immediately after graduation she became an assistant in the schools of Millersburg, Mercer County, where she remained one year. In September, 1879, she entered the Bloomington corps, where she remained until her death. The following sketch is taken from the Bloomington Pantagraph, for which it was prepared by Rev. J. W. Dinsmore: “A very great company attended the funeral of the above-named young lady, at the Second Presbyterian church, yesterday afternoon. It is creditable to human nature that so great public interest should be shown in a simple school teacher. Many a millionaire has been carried to his grave without a tithe of the respect and sympathy that were shown yesterday for the memory of this modest girl. From our public schools she entered the Normal University, and having made a very successful course, she graduated in 1878. Having become a teacher in our city schools, she rapidly advanced until she became mistress of the highest room in No. 1, and some months ago was promoted to be principal of No. 3. To this creditable distinction she was borne, not by the strong hands of influential friends, but by the simple force of real merit and industry. She was thoroughly devoted to her calling; talented, diligent, painstaking, and full of a sustained enthusiasm. She gave much promise of a brilliant career in her chosen work. She was a faithful member of the Second Presbyterian church, being a pupil, and lately a teacher, in the Sunday school, much admired and respected by her pastor, and by all who have knowledge of her ways of life. Her loving and sacrificing devotion to her foster parents was beautiful and noble. No less was she devoted to the mother that bore her, although necessarily living mostly at a long distance from her. She was called away suddenly, just as promise was budding into fulfillment, as hope was waxing into realization. A highly intelligent, attractive, amiable, and whole-hearted young woman,—a sincere disciple of Jesus Christ,—well qualified to live, well qualified also to die. Peace to her ashes, while her memory will be long and lovingly cherished by many who knew her in life. This little tribute is gladly laid on her grave by one who knew her well, and valued her highly.”

344. Helen L. Wyckoff, 1878-9, taught in Centralia; 1879-81 in Roberts, Illinois. Since February, 1882, she has been teaching in Bloomington.

345. Osci J. Bainum, 1878-80, taught at Parkersburg. Since September, 1880, he has been principal of the Olney high school.

346. John T. Bowles, 1878-80, was principal of the Naples schools. He was married in November, 1879, to Miss Clara Webster; in 1880-1 he taught at Gridley; in 1881-2 he was principal of the Metropolis high school. He is now superintendent of the Metropolis schools.

347. Oliver P. Burger, 1878-9, taught in country schools near El Paso; 1879-80 at Crittenden, New York; 1880-1 taught at Spring Bay; in 1881-2 he was principal of the Secor schools. He is now at Maroa, Illinois.

348. Gilbert A. Burgess, 1878-81, was principal of the schools at Monticello. He was then appointed county superintendent.

349. Arthur C. Butler, 1878-80, was principal of the Normal public schools. Since then he has been principal of the Virginia, Illinois, schools.

350. Andrew W. Elder, 1878-9, taught at New Boston; 1880-1 taught; 1881-2 was principal of the Centralia schools. He is now teaching in Denver, Colorado.

351. Willis C. Glidden taught from the time he entered until graduation. He graduated from the Homeopathic Medical College, Chicago, in June, 1879, and is practicing in Beloit, Kansas. He was married in June, 1881, to Miss Leager.

352. C. Guy Laybourn, 1878-80, was principal of the preparatory department of Markham’s Academy, Milwaukee. In the summer of 1880 he visited Europe. On his return he entered the Ann Arbor law school, and remained there one year. He was admitted to practice in Iowa, and is now a member of the firm of Wilson & Laybourn, Creston, Iowa.

353. Edwin H. Rishel taught at Adeline in 1878-9. He is now teaching in a colored university at Selma, Alabama. He was married in the summer of 1880.

354. William N. Spencer taught three months in Piatt County; one year in Hardin County; one year in Blandville, Ky., and the last year at Carterville, Missouri.

355. George I. Talbot taught in Victor in 1878-9; in Shabbona in 1879-80. In December, 1881, he was elected county superintendent. His address is Shabbona.

356. Rachel M. Fell (H. S.) taught in Normal public schools two years. She is now working in labratory of natural history.

357. Annie Sudduth (H. S.) is at her home. Normal, Illinois.

358. Doras R. Hatch (H S.), 1878-9, was principal of the Barry schools. He held the same position until January, 1880, when his eyes became so weak that he resigned and commenced treatment. Since then he has been railroading. He is now in Chicago under a physician’s care. His address is 13 Avon Place.

359. Theodore W. Peers (H. S.), 1878-1, taught in the “colored department” of the Collinsville schools. He is now at Ann Arbor, Michigan.


CLASS OF 1879.

360. Annette S. Bowman, since graduating, has taught as assistant in the Rock Island high school.

361. Amanda M. Crawford is continuing her studies at Normal.

362. Mary S. Cummings taught in district schools nine months. She is in the millinery business at Macon.

363. Daisy (Hubbard) Carlock, 1879-80, taught at Roodhouse; 1880-1 she taught in Morris. In the summer of 1881 she was married to Mr. Carlock. Her address is Hudson.

364. Harriet E. Morse, 1879-80, taught at Pekin, and has since taught at Oregon, Illinois.

365. Nettie (Porter) Powers, 1879-80, taught in Mendota; 1880-1 in Omaha. In the summer of 1881 she was married to Horace E. Powers, of Omaha.

366. Lizzie Ross, since graduation, has taught at Pekin.

367. Julia Scott, 1879-81, taught in Mendota. She was assistant in Normal University from January, 1882, to the end of the year. Her address is Pecatonica.

368. Emily (Sherman) Boyer, 1880-1, taught in Astoria; 1881-2 in Normal public schools. In July, 1882, she was married to E. R. Boyer. They live at Lewistown, Illinois.

369. Jennie A. Wood, 1879-80, taught in Minonk; in Perry, Ohio, ten months, and is now teaching near Perry.

370. Emanuel R. Boyer, 1879-81, was principal of the Astoria schools. He has since been principal of the Lewistown schools. In July, 1882, he married Emily A. Sherman.

371. C. R. Cross has been principal at Sparland, Illinois, since graduation.

372. Silas Y. Gillan was principal of the Galena schools in 1879-81, and has since been principal of the Danville high school. In the summer of 1880 he was married to Lizzie K. Harned.

373. Horace E. Powers graduated from Ann Arbor law school, and is now practicing in Omaha. In the summer of 1881 he married Nettie B. Porter.

374. William C. Ramsey, 1879-80, taught at Galt, California; 1880-2 at Stockton. He now has charge of the Normal Department of the Stockton Business College.

375. Fannie C. Fell (H. S.) is at her home, in Normal. She taught a few months at Streator, Illinois, but ill health compelled her to resign.

376. Hattie Follette (H. S.) is at her home, in Normal.

377. Mary Sudduth (H. S.) is continuing her studies at Vassar College.

378. Nelson K. McCormick (H. S) graduated from the Wesleyan University in 1881, and is now at work in the State laboratory of natural history, Normal.

379. Frank M. McMurry (H. S.) taught five months near Farmer City, and four months at Empire. He is continuing his studies at Ann Arbor. His address is Normal.

380. Oscar L. McMurry (H.S.) taught four months near Clifton, and then went to Ann Arbor. His address is Normal.

381. Thomas Williams (H. S.) is in the stock business in Kansas. Address Bloomington.

382. Elizabeth Baumgardner, for two years, taught the primary department of the Gardner schools. She is now principal of the same schools.

383. Helen Baxter, since graduation, has been teaching at Griggsville.

384. Lillie M. Brown, during part of the year 1881, taught in Mendota. She is now teaching in Berea, Kentucky.

385. May Hewett, since September, 1881, has been teaching in Oak Park.

386. Helen F. Moore taught in Decatur until December, 1881, when she resigned to go to Albuquerque, New Mexico.

387. Isabel Overman, 1880-1, taught in Gardner; 1881-2 she taught six months in Piatt County. Her address is 2715 Wabash Avenue, Chicago.

388. Mary E. Parker, 1880-1, taught in Eskridge, Kansas; 1881-2 in McPherson, Kansas. She is now teaching in Gardner.

389. Grace W. Weeks, 1880-1, taught in Dwight. She spent the summer of 1881 in Normal. She is now in the south.

390. James W. Adams, 1880-2, taught in Forrest.

391. Andrew L. Anderson, 1881-2, taught near Chandlerville, Cass County.

392. Alpheus Dillon has taught a school near home five months.

393. James M. Harper, 1880-2, was principal of the Gardner schools. He is now teaching in Miltford, Illinois.

394. Woodman K. Marriott, 1880-2, was principal of the Port Byron schools.

395. Carleton E. Webster taught two years in the Ottawa township high school. He is now principal of the Dixon schools.

396. Edgar Wyatt, 1880-1, was principal of the Chapin schools.

397. Alice C. McCormick (H. S.) taught one year at Naples. She is now continuing her studies at Normal.

398. Frances Ohr (H. S.) taught one year in Gardner, one year in Centralia, and is now in the Normal public schools.

399. F. L. Lufkin (H. S.) is continuing his studies at Ann Arbor.

400. Herbert McNulta (H. S.) is in Annapolis Naval Academy.

401. George K. Smith (H. S.) taught in Maroa one year, and is now working in a railroad office in Denver. His address is 290 Lincoln Avenue.


CLASS OF 1881.

402. Sarah A. Anderson is teaching in the Delavan schools.

403. Clara A. W. Bowles, since graduation, has been teaching in Metropolis, Illinois.

404. Mary R. Graston taught two months in Mendota, and since in Astoria, Illinois.

405. Addie Gillan taught in the Harvard schools, 1881-2.

406. Mary J. Gillan taught one year in Farmer City. She is now at Danville.

407. Belle Hobbs is teaching in the Metropolis schools.

408. Annie P. Knight; health does not permit her to teach.

409. Helen Middlekauf is continuing her studies at Wellesley, Massachusetts.

410. Celia S. Mills taught at Mendota in 1881-2. She is now in Normal.

411. Carrie Rich is in the Shawneetown schools.

412. Mary A. Springer is in the Elizabeth, Illinois, schools.

413. Lizzie P. Swan taught but five months at Metropolis, resigning on account of ill health.

414. William H. Bean taught one year in Blue Mound, and is now at Ann Arbor.

415. Isaac L. Betzer principal of East Side schools, Champaign.

416. Elmer E. Brown is principal of the Belvidere schools.

417. James B. Estee taught one year at Woodstock, Illinois.

418. G. Frank Miner is principal of the Hennepin schools.

419. Wendall Puckett studied one year at Normal.

420. Edward Shannon is principal of the Payson schools.

421. Elmer E. Shinkle died of malarial fever in August, 1881.

422. John H. Tear is principal of the Astoria schools.

423. Nathan T. Veatch is principal of the Butler schools.

424. Charles Walter, Alton, Illinois.


CLASS OF 1882.

425. Mattie V. Bean.

426. Matilda Glanville teaches at DeKalb, Illinois.

427. Camilla Jenkins teaches at Butler.

428. Lida Kelly teaches in Normal public schools.

429. Cora A. Lurton teaches at Elgin.

430. Mattie B. Maxwell teaches at Plainfield, Illinois.

431. Lillian Pillsbury teaches in the Belvidere schools.

432. Mattie L. Powell teaches in Amboy.

433. Florence Hubbard Reid is at Normal.

434. Louisa M. Scott teaches at Magnolia, Illinois.

435. Lettie J. Smiley teaches at Gardner, Illinois.

436. B. Bayliss Beecher (H. S.) teaches in McLean County.

437. Charles Fordyce teaches in McLean, Illinois.

438. Jesse F. Hannah teaches in Peru, Illinois.

430. James V. McHugh is principal of the Normal public schools.

440. Murray M. Morrison teaches at Adeline.

441. George W. Reeder teaches at Mt. Pulaski.

442. Milton R. Regan teaches at Auburn, Illinois.

443. Edwin E. Rosenberry teaches at Franklin Grove, Illinois.

444. Charles N. Smith is studying medicine in Danville.

445. William J. Smith teaches at Oak Hill.

446. Evens W. Thomas teaches in the Normal Department of the University of Colorado, at Boulder.

447. Franklin L. Williams teaches in Loda, Illinois.


BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY.

Richard Edwards, LL. D., president of the State Normal School from 1862 to 1876, was born at Aberystwyth, Cardiganshire, Wales, December 23, 1822. His parents were classed among the common people. His father was a stone and brick-mason, and his mother, nee Jones, was the daughter of a thrifty farmer in moderate circumstances. Owing to the limited means of his parents, his early education was sadly neglected. At the age of ten, his father became interested in the New World, and moved westward. Pleased with Ohio, he located in the northern part, on a tract of land known in history as the Western Reserve. Richard, until he was twenty-two, worked on a farm, sometimes turning the soil and sometimes plying the trade of a carpenter. These industries, however, were not suited to his taste and character. He desired something more elevating. At this time it was his good fortune to meet two scholarly gentlemen who had completed the classical course at Harvard. They gave him some wholesome advice respecting the advantages of an education, and after carefully considering their counsel he determined to go to college. After much hard work he succeeded in gaining admission to the Freshman class at Harvard. He remained at Harvard only a short time. Afterward, he completed the Normal course at Bridgewater, Massachusetts, and in 1847 became a student in Rensellaer Polytechnic Institute, at Troy, New York. He has taught at Hingham, Waltham, Bridgewater, and Salem, Massachusetts. After leaving Bridgewater he became the agent of the State Board of Education in visiting schools. For three years he was principal of the State Normal School, at Salem, Massachusetts. In 1857 he was appointed principal of the city Normal School of St. Louis, Missouri. In January, 1862, he became president of the Illinois State Normal University. In 1876 he resigned this position and accepted a call to the Congregational church at Princeton, Ill., where he is engaged at present.

Edwin O. Hewett, LL. D., president of the Illinois State formal University, was born in Worcester County, Massachusetts, November 1, 1828. His childhood was spent on a farm with his parents, who are still living. At the age of thirteen he learned the shoemaker’s trade, and began to do for himself. The day he was twenty-one he engaged his first school, and received as a recompense, $13 per month. He has had wonderful success as a teacher. His services have ever been in demand. Be it said to his credit that he never engaged but one school, and that was his first. In 1852 he graduated at the State Normal School in Bridgewater, Massachusetts; in 1853 he became an assistant teacher in this school, and remained four years. In the fall of 1858 he came to Illinois and entered upon his duties as Professor of History and Geography, in the Normal University; in January, 1876, he was appointed president; in 1863 he received the degree of A. M. from the University of Chicago; in 1877 he received the title of LL. D. from Shurtleff College. As an instructor, Dr. Hewett has few equals in the Union. His practical experience, keen perception, and laconic forms of expression, have gained for him an enviable reputation among the educators of this nation.

Thomas Metcalf was born in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, in 1826. His father was a farmer in poor circumstances, but was able to give his children the advantages of attendance, for one or two years, at an academy, in addition to the meager opportunity afforded by the district school. The latter was seldom kept for more than five months each year, and this in the warm season, in order to save the expense of fuel. During the long winter, in common with nearly all the children of that vicinity in those days, the Metcalf children braided straw for bonnets, having their daily stint from eight to twelve yards. The subject of this sketch must have been so employed for not less than seven winters. The morning of his sixteenth birthday, when, with hoe in hand, he was cutting weeds amongst the corn, he was called to take charge, “just for today,” of the school in his own district. Homesickness kept the teacher away, and gave the young farmer-boy eleven weeks practice in school-keeping, at her wages—$3 per week. For five years teaching district school, alternated with attendance at an academy, not without occasional experiences at home with scythe, rake, and plow. At the age of twenty-one came the year’s course at the Bridgewater Normal school, followed by an immediate engagement as sub-master in a grammar school on Bunker Hill. Two hard, but helpful years, here were followed by seven years as principal of a grammar school in West Roxbury. He came west in 1857, leaving the last named school for the assistant’s position in the St. Louis high school, where, as professor of mathematics, and afterward as principal of the combined high and Normal School, he taught five years. From that was called, by President Edwards, in June, 1862, to this University as professor of mathematics; then, in 1873, the Board established the training department on a new footing, and he was appointed to the new chair. Prof. Metcalf has taught nearly forty years. In the spring of 1871, he visited England, Scotland, and Continental Europe, returning in August with health much improved.

Albert Stetson, professor of language and literature, was born in Kingston, Mass., in 1834. One year of his boyhood was spent in pegging shoes, and during the summers of his fourteenth and fifteenth years he was employed in a tack factory. In 1852-3 he took the Bridgewater Normal course. The next year he had charge of a grammar school, situated at the extreme end of Cape Cod. The following year Mr. Stetson went to Yellow Springs, Ohio, where he entered the preparatory department of Antioch College. Here circumstances afforded him an excellent opportunity of becoming acquainted with the distinguished president of the college, Horace Mann. In July, 1858, he was admitted to the Freshman class of Harvard College. The college vacation of six weeks was spent in hard study, and at the beginning of the school year he entered the Sophomore class. His expenses at Harvard were paid with his own earnings, save a little assistance received from the college. While at college, he was one of the editors of the Harvard Magazine. He graduated in 1861, and in 1862 was suddenly transplanted from the shores of the Atlantic to this University in the midst of the prairies. The Illinois Schoolmaster was founded and edited by Mr. Stetson. In 1878 he visited Europe.

In the order of entering the Bridgewater school, the names of our presidents and professors stand thus: Edwards, Metcalf, Moore, Hewett, Stetson, spanning the period from 1845 to 1853. All these men were assistants in the school for at least one term,—Edwards and Hewett for several years; and all ascribe a large share of whatever success has attended their labors to the influence of that quiet, thorough, honest graduate of West Point, Nicholas Tillinghast.

Joseph Addison Sewall was born in 1830, in Scarborough, Me. He graduated from Harvard in 1852, and received the degree of M. D. In 1860 he completed the scientific course, in the same college. Between the years 1852 and 1856, he practiced medicine in Bureau and LaSalle Counties. In the fall of 1860 he was appointed professor of natural science in the Normal University. He went to Colorado in 1878. He is now president of the Colorado State University.

W. L. Pillsbury was born in Derry, N. H., November 4, 1838. He was brought up on a farm. He went to Pinkerton Academy, in Derry, for about a year, and when nearly eighteen, went to Phillips Academy, at Andover, where he prepared for college. Entered Harvard in 1859, and graduated in 1863. He came to Normal as principal of the model school, in 1863, and remained until 1870. His teaching was all done in the high school, and he seldom had anything to do with the other departments. From 1870 to 1879 he was engaged in the insurance and real estate business. In 1879 he received the appointment of chief clerk in the office of Mr. Slade, State Superintendent. He was married December 26, 1866, to Miss Marion Hammond, of St. Louis, who had charge of the primary department in the Normal University.

John W. Cook was born in New York, April 20, 1844, and is the son of Col. H. D. Cook. In 1851 Mr. Cook came west with his parents, and settled in McLean County, Illinois. He entered the State Normal University in 1862, and graduated in 1865. He then began teaching school at Brimfield, Peoria County, Illinois. Here he remained but one year, and returned to Normal, and became principal in the model school department. In 1867 he was married to Lydia Spafford, sister of Mrs. Gen. Hovey. In 1868 he became a member of the Normal Faculty, and taught history and geography. In 1869 he changed to reading and elocution. In 1876 he was appointed professor of mathematics.

Stephen A. Forbes was born in Stephenson County, Illinois, in 1844. He worked on a farm until the age of fourteen, when he entered the preparatory department of Beloit College. In 1861 he enlisted as a private in Company B, Seventh I. V. C. He was honorably discharged at the close of the war, bearing the title of captain. Immediately after the war closed, he entered Rush Medical College, of Chicago. In 1867 he taught school in southern Illinois. Before receiving the appointment of curator of the museum of the Illinois Normal School, which he did in 1872, he was superintendent of the public schools of Mt. Vernon. He is now State Entomologist, having been recently appointed by Gov. Cullom.

Lester L. Burrington was born in Burke, Caledonia County, Vermont, March 24, 1838. He attended the district school of his native State, and graduated at Tufts’ College, near Boston, in 1866. For a short time he was professor of ancient languages in Dean Academy, at Franklin, Massachusetts. He held the same position in Goddard Seminary, Vermont, for four years. From here he came west. In January, 1874, he accepted a position in the State Normal University as principal of the high school. He resigned in 1879. He is at present president of the Dean Academy, at Franklin, Massachusetts.

Edmund J. James was born May 21, 1855, at Jacksonville, Morgan County, Illinois. His parents settled on a farm near Normal, in 1863. He entered the lowest class of the grammar school in the model department of State Normal in the spring of 1866. He remained in the model department six years and one term, graduating from the high school in 1873. He then spent two terms in the classical department of the Northwestern University, at Evanston. After holding a position for one season (six months) in one of the field parties of the U. S. Lake survey, he went to Harvard College in October, 1874, and remained one year, making a specialty of the classics. He went to Germany in August, 1875, attended the universities of Berlin and Halle, studying history, political science, and philosophy. He graduated at Halle in August, 1877, with the degrees of A. M. and Ph. D. He then took charge of the Evanston high school, January 1, 1878, and entered on his present work in September, 1879. He is turning his attention to political economy, and is one of the contributors to the Encyclopedia of Political Science, now being published.

Minor L. Seymour was born in Genoa, New York, in 1835. He attended a district school till the age of nineteen, afterward Owego Academy, Ithaca Academy, and the Illinois Normal University, each one term. At present he is our professor of natural science.

Henry McCormick was born in 1837, in Mayo County, Ireland. In 1853 he came to America, spent two years in Ohio, one in West Virginia, and then went to Wisconsin, working on a farm in summer and going to school in winter, until the winter of 1859-60, when he taught his first school in a log school house for $16 a month, “boarding around.” The school house being on the line between Illinois and Wisconsin, he had to undergo examination in both States. The next year he was promoted to a stone school house and $23 a month. This school he had four months of every year until the spring of 1865, when he came here as a student. In 1809, one year after graduation, he was appointed professor of geography. In the intervening year he was principal of the formal public school. Now he is professor of history and geography at the University. Last year, 1882, he received the decree of Ph. D. from the Wesleyan University.

B. W. Baker, a farmer’s boy, was born in Coles County, Illinois, November 25, 1811. He entered the army at the age of twenty, and served from 1861 to 1964 in the Illinois Volunteers. He entered the formal University in 1867, and graduated in 1870. Since graduation he has taught in the grammar school of the University, and is now preaching in Colorado.

Charles DeGarmo was born in the State of Wisconsin in 1849. At the age of two his parents moved to Sterling, Ill., where he lived ten years. Afterward he lived at Lebanon, St. Clair County, Illinois. He enlisted in the army at the age of sixteen, and served one year. He saw all the great battle fields of Georgia, one year after the battles. He entered the Normal University in the fall of 1870, and graduated in the spring of 1873. He was married in 1875 to Miss Ida Witbeck, of Belvidere, Ill., who was for two years a student in the University. He has worked in institutes for eight years. At various times he has done institute work in Shelby, Jo Daviess, Lee, Fayette, and McLean Counties: also, in the State of Iowa.

Mrs. M. D. L. Haynie was born in Danville, Kentucky, in 1826, the daughter of Dr. Duff Green. At the age of five she entered the primary department of an Episcopal Seminary, and remained there seven years, having completed a year of high-school work. She was then placed in a Presbyterian Ladies’ Seminary, where she completed the course, after which she spent several years in southern Tennessee. When she was twenty years of age her father moved to Mt. Vernon, Illinois, and soon after she, in connection with her sister, now Mrs. Gray, opened a school. The experiment succeeded. She taught in Mt. Vernon about one year, and a year and a half in Salem, Illinois. In October 1849, she was married to Dr. A. F. Haynie, of Salem, who died in 1851. In 1855 she accepted a position in an academy in Mt. Vernon, and soon after was given the entire control of the young ladies’ department. She resigned in 1866, and became teacher of language in the model department at Normal. Since 1876 she has held the position of professor of modern languages in Normal University.

Flora Pennell was born in Putnam, the smallest county in Illinois, in the town of Granville, which, in the early history of the State, was one of the centers of education. She began attending school at the age of four, and has not been out of school (either as a pupil or a teacher) any whole year since. At the age of twelve she moved to Normal, and entered the grammar school of the University. She entered the Normal in the fall of 1869, and graduated in 1872. The next year she taught a country school, one mile west of Bloomington. In the fall of 1873 she went to Vassar College, and in the year 1874: she became an assistant in the high school at Elgin, Illinois, where she remained for three years. From Elgin she came to teach in the Normal Department in the fall of 1877.

Julia E. Kennedy was born in southern Illinois. She attended the district school and the spelling school, where she often “spelled down” all competitors, until the age of fifteen. At this time her father died, and she taught her first school in a log school house. She entered the Normal at seventeen, and graduated in 1871, valedictorian of her class. Since then she has taught in Missouri, as principal of a school in St. Louis, and as professor of rhetoric in Cape Girardeau. In 1879 she came here and took charge of the primary department.

Rosalie Miller was born at New Haven, Connecticut. She graduated at the Westfield, Massachusetts, Normal School. Entered upon the profession of teaching in Massachusetts, and in 1871 came to Normal. At that time there was in the Normal Department only one lady teacher, Miss Case. Before this time there had been no regular teacher of drawing, and there were no casts, or any of the apparatus used in that department now. Since she came here, Miss Miller has been constantly studying and perfecting herself in the different branches of her art.

M. Emma Skinner, the most youthful member of the faculty, was born on a farm, one mile from Princeton, Illinois. She attended the district school, later the Princeton high school, from which she graduated at the age of sixteen, valedictorian of her class. Still later, after a two years’ course of study, she graduated from the School of Oratory, of Boston University, under the late Lewis B. Monroe, being one of twelve to represent the class of forty. The two years following she taught reading, in the high school at Princeton; thence to Normal, in the fall of 1881.
Source: A History of the Illinois State Normal University, by John W. Cook and James V. McHugh, 1882, Illinois: Normal